2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163322
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Milking the umbilical cord at birth: A review of the literature
Author(s):
Erickson-Owens, Debra A.; Mercer, Judith S.
Author Details:
Debra A. Erickson-Owens, MS, CNM, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, Rhode Island, USA, email: debeo@uri.edu; Judith S. Mercer, DNSc, CNM, FACNM
Abstract:
Purpose: Iron deficiency in neonates poses a significant public health problem. Poor iron stores in the first year of life can lead to iron deficiency with the potential to cause harm. Maximizing infant-placental transfusion at birth can result in higher neonatal hemoglobin (HGB) levels. The purpose of this review of literature was to: 1) identify all available research on milking the umbilical cord (MC) at birth, 2) examine potential clinical benefits of MC with reference to maximizing infant-placental transfusion and prevention of neonatal iron deficiency anemia and 3) generate a hypothesis for a future randomized control trial. Theoretical Framework: The Blood Volume Model for Neonatal Transition is used as the underlying framework for this review. The model proposes that delayed cord clamping (DCC) enhances infant-placental transfusion, maximizes red cell and blood volume and can result in higher neonatal hemoglobin levels. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A literature review using the search terms of milking and/or stripping the umbilical cord resulted in 9 previous research studies involving 773 babies. The studies, done over 35 years ago, compared the cord management techniques of DCC, immediate cord clamping (ICC) and MC. The neonatal outcomes most frequently cited in the literature were levels of HGB, hematocrit (HCT), red blood cells, bilirubin and birth weight. Results: MC and DCC resulted in higher neonatal HGB and HCT levels and initial birth weight when compared to infants with ICC. There was no increase in jaundice or symptomatic polycythemia reported among the infants with MC in the 9 previous studies. Conclusions and Implications: This review indicates increased HGB levels with no harm from MC. The last study on MC was done over 35 years ago. It is time to reexamine this low tech, low cost technique as a strategy to maximize infant-placental transfusion and prevent neonatal anemia.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMilking the umbilical cord at birth: A review of the literatureen_GB
dc.contributor.authorErickson-Owens, Debra A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMercer, Judith S.en_US
dc.author.detailsDebra A. Erickson-Owens, MS, CNM, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, Rhode Island, USA, email: debeo@uri.edu; Judith S. Mercer, DNSc, CNM, FACNMen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163322-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Iron deficiency in neonates poses a significant public health problem. Poor iron stores in the first year of life can lead to iron deficiency with the potential to cause harm. Maximizing infant-placental transfusion at birth can result in higher neonatal hemoglobin (HGB) levels. The purpose of this review of literature was to: 1) identify all available research on milking the umbilical cord (MC) at birth, 2) examine potential clinical benefits of MC with reference to maximizing infant-placental transfusion and prevention of neonatal iron deficiency anemia and 3) generate a hypothesis for a future randomized control trial. Theoretical Framework: The Blood Volume Model for Neonatal Transition is used as the underlying framework for this review. The model proposes that delayed cord clamping (DCC) enhances infant-placental transfusion, maximizes red cell and blood volume and can result in higher neonatal hemoglobin levels. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A literature review using the search terms of milking and/or stripping the umbilical cord resulted in 9 previous research studies involving 773 babies. The studies, done over 35 years ago, compared the cord management techniques of DCC, immediate cord clamping (ICC) and MC. The neonatal outcomes most frequently cited in the literature were levels of HGB, hematocrit (HCT), red blood cells, bilirubin and birth weight. Results: MC and DCC resulted in higher neonatal HGB and HCT levels and initial birth weight when compared to infants with ICC. There was no increase in jaundice or symptomatic polycythemia reported among the infants with MC in the 9 previous studies. Conclusions and Implications: This review indicates increased HGB levels with no harm from MC. The last study on MC was done over 35 years ago. It is time to reexamine this low tech, low cost technique as a strategy to maximize infant-placental transfusion and prevent neonatal anemia.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:05:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:05:25Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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