2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163324
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hate Crime and Its Aftermath: Knowledge for Practice, Research, and Policy
Author(s):
Willis, Danny
Author Details:
Danny Willis, RN, DNS, Assistant Professor, Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing, Boston College, William F. Connell School of Nursing, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, USA, email: danny.willis@bc.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Hate crime against persons based on their race, religion, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and disability is a contemporary health matter. In 2002, the FBI documented 8,832 hate crimes resulting in 9,222 victims. Recently, the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) has designated hate crimes as an area of research interest regarding interpersonal violence and mental health. Given the current lack of research regarding the impact and consequences of hate crime, the purposes of this research were to describe and explicate the nature and meanings of hate crime and its aftermath among gay men. Methods: Gay men, having experienced hate crime, were recruited via volunteer sampling. Utilizing a demographic questionnaire, semi-structured interview guide, memos, and contact summary sheets, men were individually interviewed until data saturation occurred. Data collection and analysis followed Van Manen's (1984, 1990) phenomenological method. Results: Nine in-depth interviews composed the primary data set. Men ranged in age from 22 to 53 years (mean = 39.4 years). One man was African-American; all others were Caucasian. The average length of time elapsed since the hate crime experience and the interview was 3.2 years. Findings revealed that Being-Assaulted was the essence of hate crime and included three factors: Harassment, Physical Assault, and Self-defense. Other essences, specific to the aftermath, were: Living-Awareness and Psychosocial Restriction. Living-Awareness was shaped by four features: Embodying Traumatic Distress, Enacting Hyper-vigilance, Reflecting on Meaning, and Identifying Consciousness Raising Needs. Psychosocial Restriction included two key factors: Spoiled Intimacy and Limited Socialization. Conclusions and Implications: Hate crime and its aftermath is a transformative health-illness experience that has consequences for one's sense of lived body, environment, and relations. It impacts the victim's well-being, safety, psychosocial functioning, meaning, trust, and connectedness in the world. Health, societal, and criminal justice issues have been identified that have implications for practice, research, and policy.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHate Crime and Its Aftermath: Knowledge for Practice, Research, and Policyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWillis, Dannyen_US
dc.author.detailsDanny Willis, RN, DNS, Assistant Professor, Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing, Boston College, William F. Connell School of Nursing, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, USA, email: danny.willis@bc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163324-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Hate crime against persons based on their race, religion, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and disability is a contemporary health matter. In 2002, the FBI documented 8,832 hate crimes resulting in 9,222 victims. Recently, the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) has designated hate crimes as an area of research interest regarding interpersonal violence and mental health. Given the current lack of research regarding the impact and consequences of hate crime, the purposes of this research were to describe and explicate the nature and meanings of hate crime and its aftermath among gay men. Methods: Gay men, having experienced hate crime, were recruited via volunteer sampling. Utilizing a demographic questionnaire, semi-structured interview guide, memos, and contact summary sheets, men were individually interviewed until data saturation occurred. Data collection and analysis followed Van Manen's (1984, 1990) phenomenological method. Results: Nine in-depth interviews composed the primary data set. Men ranged in age from 22 to 53 years (mean = 39.4 years). One man was African-American; all others were Caucasian. The average length of time elapsed since the hate crime experience and the interview was 3.2 years. Findings revealed that Being-Assaulted was the essence of hate crime and included three factors: Harassment, Physical Assault, and Self-defense. Other essences, specific to the aftermath, were: Living-Awareness and Psychosocial Restriction. Living-Awareness was shaped by four features: Embodying Traumatic Distress, Enacting Hyper-vigilance, Reflecting on Meaning, and Identifying Consciousness Raising Needs. Psychosocial Restriction included two key factors: Spoiled Intimacy and Limited Socialization. Conclusions and Implications: Hate crime and its aftermath is a transformative health-illness experience that has consequences for one's sense of lived body, environment, and relations. It impacts the victim's well-being, safety, psychosocial functioning, meaning, trust, and connectedness in the world. Health, societal, and criminal justice issues have been identified that have implications for practice, research, and policy.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:05:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:05:27Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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