Quality of Life of Patients with Advanced Cancer and AIDS and their Family Caregivers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163325
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Quality of Life of Patients with Advanced Cancer and AIDS and their Family Caregivers
Author(s):
Witt Sherman, Deborah; McSherry, Christina
Author Details:
Deborah Witt Sherman, PhD, APRN, ANP, PCM, BC, FAAN, Associate Professor, New York University, New York, New York, USA, email: Das1@nyu.edu; Christina McSherry, RN, MA
Abstract:
Purpose: This prospective longitudinal pilot identified mortality, attrition, and compliance rates for patients with advanced cancer and AIDS; differences and trends in quality of life of patients and family caregivers, and demographic variables of the groups. Methods: 101 patients with advanced illness (AIDS n=63, cancer n=38) and 81 family caregivers (AIDS n=43, cancer n=38). Monthly data were collected: McGill Quality of Life Questionnaire (MQOL) for patients, and the Quality of Life Scale (QLS) for caregivers. Results: Twenty-two percent (n=14) of AIDS patients and 50% (n=19) cancer patients died. Seventy-three percent (n=46) of AIDS patients and 39% (n=15) patients with cancer withdrew for various reasons. withdrew. Compared to patients with advanced cancer, patients with advanced AIDS reported a lower total and psychological quality of life and a higher physical quality of life. There were no significant differences in physical or existential well-being subscales, or the support subscales. AIDS caregivers reported greater overall quality of life, greater psychological well-being, and greater spiritual well-being than cancer caregivers. There was no significant difference in physical or social well-being. From baseline entry into the study to 3rd month of participation, there were no significant changes in total quality of life scores for patient or caregiver groups, though trends indicated a moderately high total quality of life over time for all patient and caregiver groups. There were significant differences on all demographic variables for patients with advanced cancer and AIDS. Implications/Conclusions: In palliative care research, the challenge is to design studies that will capture changes in the domains of quality of life over time, yet will minimize participant burden and subsequent attrition rates. By measuring quality of life as an outcome variable in palliative care, health professionals can identify changes in the domains of quality of life over time for various patient populations and their family caregivers, and respond with appropriate interventions which promote their quality of life even as death approaches.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQuality of Life of Patients with Advanced Cancer and AIDS and their Family Caregiversen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWitt Sherman, Deborahen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcSherry, Christinaen_US
dc.author.detailsDeborah Witt Sherman, PhD, APRN, ANP, PCM, BC, FAAN, Associate Professor, New York University, New York, New York, USA, email: Das1@nyu.edu; Christina McSherry, RN, MAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163325-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This prospective longitudinal pilot identified mortality, attrition, and compliance rates for patients with advanced cancer and AIDS; differences and trends in quality of life of patients and family caregivers, and demographic variables of the groups. Methods: 101 patients with advanced illness (AIDS n=63, cancer n=38) and 81 family caregivers (AIDS n=43, cancer n=38). Monthly data were collected: McGill Quality of Life Questionnaire (MQOL) for patients, and the Quality of Life Scale (QLS) for caregivers. Results: Twenty-two percent (n=14) of AIDS patients and 50% (n=19) cancer patients died. Seventy-three percent (n=46) of AIDS patients and 39% (n=15) patients with cancer withdrew for various reasons. withdrew. Compared to patients with advanced cancer, patients with advanced AIDS reported a lower total and psychological quality of life and a higher physical quality of life. There were no significant differences in physical or existential well-being subscales, or the support subscales. AIDS caregivers reported greater overall quality of life, greater psychological well-being, and greater spiritual well-being than cancer caregivers. There was no significant difference in physical or social well-being. From baseline entry into the study to 3rd month of participation, there were no significant changes in total quality of life scores for patient or caregiver groups, though trends indicated a moderately high total quality of life over time for all patient and caregiver groups. There were significant differences on all demographic variables for patients with advanced cancer and AIDS. Implications/Conclusions: In palliative care research, the challenge is to design studies that will capture changes in the domains of quality of life over time, yet will minimize participant burden and subsequent attrition rates. By measuring quality of life as an outcome variable in palliative care, health professionals can identify changes in the domains of quality of life over time for various patient populations and their family caregivers, and respond with appropriate interventions which promote their quality of life even as death approaches.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:05:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:05:28Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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