2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163326
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Use of Standardized Diagnostic Interviews to Validate Self-Report: Symptom Scores
Author(s):
Wojcik, Joanne; Cousins, Ann; Horowitz, June Andrews; Pulcini, Joyce A.
Author Details:
Joanne Wojcik, MS, APRN, BC, Doctoral Student, Boston College, William F. Connell School of Nursing, Watertown, Massachusetts, USA, email: joanne_wojcik@hms.harvard.edu; Ann Cousins, MSN, BC; June Andrews Horowitz, PhD, APRN, BC, FAAN; Joyce A. Pulcini, PhD, RNCS, PNP, FAAN
Abstract:
Purpose: Self-report symptom measures are used to screen at-risk groups and identify potential research participants. However, self-reported symptoms reflect the viewpoint of the individual, and may require validation. Furthermore, self-identified groups often yield a large number of false positives, and diagnoses cannot be determined solely by self-report. In addition, access to health records to confirm diagnoses is difficult at best or impossible for community-based populations. Therefore, the purpose of this presentation is to illustrate use of a standardized diagnostic interview to confirm self-report symptom scores. Methods: Use of a standardized diagnostic interview will identify a subset of people who meet study inclusion criteria, indicate how to rule out false positives, and validate symptom severity. The approach used in the CARE study (Communicating And Relating Effectively, R01 NR08033) illustrates how self-report symptom scores that meet an established cut-off can be validated. The researchers use the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) to identify postpartum women with elevated depression symptoms. To confirm study eligibility, advanced practice nurses (APRNs) subsequently conduct standard diagnostic interviews to determine depression status. Results: This two-step approach involving self-report symptom screening followed by diagnostic interviews for women with positive scores is a cost-effective way to confirm diagnostic status that can be adapted for other studies. The use of a standardized diagnostic interview conducted by APRNs enhances study reliability by ensuring that participants have a designated condition or meet a predetermined symptom severity level. Conclusions and Implications: Use of a standardized diagnostic interview can confirm self-report symptoms. Even when additional tests are required to confirm a diagnosis, standardized interviews are valuable tools to validate symptom severity. As skilled clinicians, APRNs trained in research protocols can provide valuable clinical evaluation and diagnostic accuracy using standardized diagnostic interviews.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUse of Standardized Diagnostic Interviews to Validate Self-Report: Symptom Scoresen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWojcik, Joanneen_US
dc.contributor.authorCousins, Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorHorowitz, June Andrewsen_US
dc.contributor.authorPulcini, Joyce A.en_US
dc.author.detailsJoanne Wojcik, MS, APRN, BC, Doctoral Student, Boston College, William F. Connell School of Nursing, Watertown, Massachusetts, USA, email: joanne_wojcik@hms.harvard.edu; Ann Cousins, MSN, BC; June Andrews Horowitz, PhD, APRN, BC, FAAN; Joyce A. Pulcini, PhD, RNCS, PNP, FAANen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163326-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Self-report symptom measures are used to screen at-risk groups and identify potential research participants. However, self-reported symptoms reflect the viewpoint of the individual, and may require validation. Furthermore, self-identified groups often yield a large number of false positives, and diagnoses cannot be determined solely by self-report. In addition, access to health records to confirm diagnoses is difficult at best or impossible for community-based populations. Therefore, the purpose of this presentation is to illustrate use of a standardized diagnostic interview to confirm self-report symptom scores. Methods: Use of a standardized diagnostic interview will identify a subset of people who meet study inclusion criteria, indicate how to rule out false positives, and validate symptom severity. The approach used in the CARE study (Communicating And Relating Effectively, R01 NR08033) illustrates how self-report symptom scores that meet an established cut-off can be validated. The researchers use the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) to identify postpartum women with elevated depression symptoms. To confirm study eligibility, advanced practice nurses (APRNs) subsequently conduct standard diagnostic interviews to determine depression status. Results: This two-step approach involving self-report symptom screening followed by diagnostic interviews for women with positive scores is a cost-effective way to confirm diagnostic status that can be adapted for other studies. The use of a standardized diagnostic interview conducted by APRNs enhances study reliability by ensuring that participants have a designated condition or meet a predetermined symptom severity level. Conclusions and Implications: Use of a standardized diagnostic interview can confirm self-report symptoms. Even when additional tests are required to confirm a diagnosis, standardized interviews are valuable tools to validate symptom severity. As skilled clinicians, APRNs trained in research protocols can provide valuable clinical evaluation and diagnostic accuracy using standardized diagnostic interviews.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:05:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:05:30Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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