2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163328
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Exercise Intervention to Prevent Hepatitis-Related Fatigue
Author(s):
Zucker, Donna
Author Details:
Donna Zucker, RN, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Amherst, Massachusetts, USA, email: donna@acad.umass.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Among 20 subjects with chronic hepatitis C (CHC), the objectives were to1) pilot test instruments measuring fatigue and quality of life (QOL), 2) pilot test an exercise intervention, and 3) estimate the effect size of this intervention on the completion of combination therapy, fatigue, QOL and walking distance. Methods: A pretest-posttest design was used. Subjects taking combination therapy were randomly assigned to either a group that received the exercise intervention (EX) or a group that received usual care (UC). A power analysis program (BMDP-Solo«) was used to calculate the posttest effect size of exercise on fatigue, QOL, walking distance and completion of treatment. Results: Post score t-tests with a power of .80 and alpha set at 0.05, calculated a small effect size for fatigue (.137) and perceived rating of exertion (.192). Small effects size scores were also found for subscales of the hepatitis quality of life scale (HQLQ) (.184-2.1). Interestingly, those in the EX had less fatigue, higher self-related physical functioning and mental health, but higher limitations and distress attributed to their hepatitis C than those in the UC group. In the post test 12 minute walk the UC group walked slightly farther. Three of 20 subjects did not complete the study (2 in EX 1 in UC). Conclusions and Implications: This study was useful in estimating a sample size of between 30 and 40 subjects per group for the next study, with the purpose of measuring the impact of the exercise intervention on several symptoms associated with CHC. Patient complaints of fatigue and other symptoms associated with treatment have impacted improvements in treatment outcomes. Day to day management of side effects remains a large life quality issue. An exercise intervention may prove useful in promoting health as well as enhancing rates of adherence to prescribed medication regimen.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
17th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
New York, New York, USA
Description:
�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New York
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Exercise Intervention to Prevent Hepatitis-Related Fatigueen_GB
dc.contributor.authorZucker, Donnaen_US
dc.author.detailsDonna Zucker, RN, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Amherst, Massachusetts, USA, email: donna@acad.umass.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163328-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Among 20 subjects with chronic hepatitis C (CHC), the objectives were to1) pilot test instruments measuring fatigue and quality of life (QOL), 2) pilot test an exercise intervention, and 3) estimate the effect size of this intervention on the completion of combination therapy, fatigue, QOL and walking distance. Methods: A pretest-posttest design was used. Subjects taking combination therapy were randomly assigned to either a group that received the exercise intervention (EX) or a group that received usual care (UC). A power analysis program (BMDP-Solo«) was used to calculate the posttest effect size of exercise on fatigue, QOL, walking distance and completion of treatment. Results: Post score t-tests with a power of .80 and alpha set at 0.05, calculated a small effect size for fatigue (.137) and perceived rating of exertion (.192). Small effects size scores were also found for subscales of the hepatitis quality of life scale (HQLQ) (.184-2.1). Interestingly, those in the EX had less fatigue, higher self-related physical functioning and mental health, but higher limitations and distress attributed to their hepatitis C than those in the UC group. In the post test 12 minute walk the UC group walked slightly farther. Three of 20 subjects did not complete the study (2 in EX 1 in UC). Conclusions and Implications: This study was useful in estimating a sample size of between 30 and 40 subjects per group for the next study, with the purpose of measuring the impact of the exercise intervention on several symptoms associated with CHC. Patient complaints of fatigue and other symptoms associated with treatment have impacted improvements in treatment outcomes. Day to day management of side effects remains a large life quality issue. An exercise intervention may prove useful in promoting health as well as enhancing rates of adherence to prescribed medication regimen.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:05:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:05:32Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name17th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationNew York, New York, USAen_US
dc.description�Translational Research for Quality Health Outcomes: Affecting Practice and Healthcare Policy�, held on April 7th -9th at the Roosevelt Hotel, New Yorken_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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