2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163329
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Interpretation and Analysis of Narrative Discourse
Author(s):
Bradway, Christine W.; Huss-Ashmore, Rebecca
Author Details:
Christine W. Bradway, University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: cwb@nursing.upenn.edu; Rebecca Huss-Ashmore, Ph.D.
Abstract:
Purpose: Scholars in health care and other fields recognize the importance of narrative analysis as a method for scholarly inquiry. Most published reports focus on rich descriptions of individual stories and attend less to methodological processes used to interpret and analyze narrative discourse. As a result, gaps exist in identifying methods for narrative analysis most appropriate to the specific aims of a research project. The purpose of this presentation is to describe in detail methodological processes used for systematic analysis and interpretation of narrative accounts of health and illness. Examples from a recent research study of female urinary incontinence are used to illustrate these processes. Theoretical Framework: The exemplar study was guided by a naturalistic paradigm. Medical anthropology provided the overall theoretical and methodological framework for this study. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Women's narratives of life with long-term urinary incontinence were transcribed, re-transcribed, and transformed to identify and emphasize the structure and plot of their stories. Using a combination of analytic and interpretive components, methodological processes were based on methods described by Labov, Gee, and Riessman. These particular approaches to narrative analysis were chosen to emphasize the linguistic and oftentimes poetic choices individuals make in patterning their talk. Results: A systematic analytic and interpretive approach using a combination of methodological processes proved to be extremely useful in examining women's narratives of long-term urinary incontinence. Conclusions and Implications: Despite limitations, narrative analysis remains an important method for examination of individual health and illness experiences. Scholars must be committed to an organized, thoughtful approach and possess a willingness to share analytic and interpretive strategies with others. Narrative analysis should be considered one of many possible methods for examining personal experience and meaning. [Symposium presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInterpretation and Analysis of Narrative Discourseen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBradway, Christine W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHuss-Ashmore, Rebeccaen_US
dc.author.detailsChristine W. Bradway, University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: cwb@nursing.upenn.edu; Rebecca Huss-Ashmore, Ph.D.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163329-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Scholars in health care and other fields recognize the importance of narrative analysis as a method for scholarly inquiry. Most published reports focus on rich descriptions of individual stories and attend less to methodological processes used to interpret and analyze narrative discourse. As a result, gaps exist in identifying methods for narrative analysis most appropriate to the specific aims of a research project. The purpose of this presentation is to describe in detail methodological processes used for systematic analysis and interpretation of narrative accounts of health and illness. Examples from a recent research study of female urinary incontinence are used to illustrate these processes. Theoretical Framework: The exemplar study was guided by a naturalistic paradigm. Medical anthropology provided the overall theoretical and methodological framework for this study. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Women's narratives of life with long-term urinary incontinence were transcribed, re-transcribed, and transformed to identify and emphasize the structure and plot of their stories. Using a combination of analytic and interpretive components, methodological processes were based on methods described by Labov, Gee, and Riessman. These particular approaches to narrative analysis were chosen to emphasize the linguistic and oftentimes poetic choices individuals make in patterning their talk. Results: A systematic analytic and interpretive approach using a combination of methodological processes proved to be extremely useful in examining women's narratives of long-term urinary incontinence. Conclusions and Implications: Despite limitations, narrative analysis remains an important method for examination of individual health and illness experiences. Scholars must be committed to an organized, thoughtful approach and possess a willingness to share analytic and interpretive strategies with others. Narrative analysis should be considered one of many possible methods for examining personal experience and meaning. [Symposium presentation]en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:05:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:05:33Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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