2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163330
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sleep Patterns in Inner City Childbearing Women
Author(s):
Caldwell, Barbara; Redeker, Nancy S.; Barrett, Theodore
Author Details:
Barbara Caldwell, PhD, RN, Associate Professor, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, School of Nursing, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: caldweba@umdnj.edu; Nancy S. Redeker, PhD, RN; Theodore Barrett, M.D.
Abstract:
Purpose: We will describe methodological issues associated with the use of wrist actigraph and self-report measures of sleep in a sample of inner city childbearing women. Theoretical Framework: Sleep disturbance is associated with chronic stress, which, in turn activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Arousal and sleeplessness increase risk for psychiatric disorders such as anxiety and depression. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Participants wore wrist actigraphs for 2-3 nights and completed sleep logs, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and questionnaires about stress, depression, and PTSD. Results: Recruitment and data collection present many challenges. Lack of transportation, stable housing, and telephones influence ability to participate in the study and add complexity to follow-up. Many women had psychiatric distress that required follow-up; substance abuse, precluding participation, was also common. Nocturnal child care had an impact on the quality of sleep. Some participants had concerns about the safety of the actigraph; tampering with the device caused loss of data. A variety of practical strategies were employed: These included careful tracking of the actigraphs and paperwork. Home visits were necessary to retrieve the actigraphs. Participants received a $75 for their involvement. Questionnaires were scored immediately at the time of data collection to evaluate psychiatric status and suicidal ideation. Referral to counseling services was provided. We provided detailed explanations about the actigraph mechanism and graphically displayed the data so that the women could see where there were gaps and thus, the need to repeat recordings. The research assistant wore the actigraph to demonstrate its safety. Conclusions and Implications: We have collected data on 115 women. Using practical strategies to address a variety of methodological issues, we have been highly successful in obtaining important information on an under-studied problem in a highly vulnerable population. [Symposium presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSleep Patterns in Inner City Childbearing Womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCaldwell, Barbaraen_US
dc.contributor.authorRedeker, Nancy S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBarrett, Theodoreen_US
dc.author.detailsBarbara Caldwell, PhD, RN, Associate Professor, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, School of Nursing, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: caldweba@umdnj.edu; Nancy S. Redeker, PhD, RN; Theodore Barrett, M.D.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163330-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: We will describe methodological issues associated with the use of wrist actigraph and self-report measures of sleep in a sample of inner city childbearing women. Theoretical Framework: Sleep disturbance is associated with chronic stress, which, in turn activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Arousal and sleeplessness increase risk for psychiatric disorders such as anxiety and depression. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Participants wore wrist actigraphs for 2-3 nights and completed sleep logs, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and questionnaires about stress, depression, and PTSD. Results: Recruitment and data collection present many challenges. Lack of transportation, stable housing, and telephones influence ability to participate in the study and add complexity to follow-up. Many women had psychiatric distress that required follow-up; substance abuse, precluding participation, was also common. Nocturnal child care had an impact on the quality of sleep. Some participants had concerns about the safety of the actigraph; tampering with the device caused loss of data. A variety of practical strategies were employed: These included careful tracking of the actigraphs and paperwork. Home visits were necessary to retrieve the actigraphs. Participants received a $75 for their involvement. Questionnaires were scored immediately at the time of data collection to evaluate psychiatric status and suicidal ideation. Referral to counseling services was provided. We provided detailed explanations about the actigraph mechanism and graphically displayed the data so that the women could see where there were gaps and thus, the need to repeat recordings. The research assistant wore the actigraph to demonstrate its safety. Conclusions and Implications: We have collected data on 115 women. Using practical strategies to address a variety of methodological issues, we have been highly successful in obtaining important information on an under-studied problem in a highly vulnerable population. [Symposium presentation]en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:05:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:05:35Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.