Private Funding for Public Health: The Case of New York City Public Health Nursing, 1895-1940

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163333
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Private Funding for Public Health: The Case of New York City Public Health Nursing, 1895-1940
Author(s):
Connolly, Cynthia
Author Details:
Cynthia Connolly, PhD, Assistant Professor, Yale University School of Nursing, New Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: cindy.connolly@yale.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Media coverage of President Bush's "charitable choice" initiative often frames this agenda as an innovative "new" collaboration between the public and private sectors. This paper is a comparative case study of early twentieth century nurses funded privately through the New York City Association for Improving the Conditions of the Poor's [AICP] Bureau of Nursing Services [BNS], to the practice of publicly funded nurses. Background: Throughout the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries large numbers of impoverished immigrants swelled the city's population and strained its nascent public health infrastructure. In an effort to prevent the spread of epidemic diseases and provide health care to all who needed it, the AICP founded a Bureau of Nursing Service and hired nurses years before the public sector. Methods (sources, analytic approach): Primary sources for this social and policy history research included AICP archives, New York City health department records, articles, books, newspapers, and governmental reports. Results: Almost as large at the Department of Health's nursing service, the BNS both supplemented and substituted for municipal agencies. The resulting confusion, duplication, and lack of accountability reveals issues inherent in a health bureaucracy in which depends on close collaboration between public and private agencies. Conclusions and Implications: This study helps dispel the notion that a privatized health and welfare system ever existed or could be a panacea for the issues facing the United States. This type of thinking employs the worst kind of nostalgic propaganda because it harkens back to a halcyon past that never existed, one wherein the private sector worked without interference from government to correct social ills. Situating this issue in the time stream of American history provides context for the contemporary political debates surrounding this issue. [Symposium presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePrivate Funding for Public Health: The Case of New York City Public Health Nursing, 1895-1940en_GB
dc.contributor.authorConnolly, Cynthiaen_US
dc.author.detailsCynthia Connolly, PhD, Assistant Professor, Yale University School of Nursing, New Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: cindy.connolly@yale.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163333-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Media coverage of President Bush's "charitable choice" initiative often frames this agenda as an innovative "new" collaboration between the public and private sectors. This paper is a comparative case study of early twentieth century nurses funded privately through the New York City Association for Improving the Conditions of the Poor's [AICP] Bureau of Nursing Services [BNS], to the practice of publicly funded nurses. Background: Throughout the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries large numbers of impoverished immigrants swelled the city's population and strained its nascent public health infrastructure. In an effort to prevent the spread of epidemic diseases and provide health care to all who needed it, the AICP founded a Bureau of Nursing Service and hired nurses years before the public sector. Methods (sources, analytic approach): Primary sources for this social and policy history research included AICP archives, New York City health department records, articles, books, newspapers, and governmental reports. Results: Almost as large at the Department of Health's nursing service, the BNS both supplemented and substituted for municipal agencies. The resulting confusion, duplication, and lack of accountability reveals issues inherent in a health bureaucracy in which depends on close collaboration between public and private agencies. Conclusions and Implications: This study helps dispel the notion that a privatized health and welfare system ever existed or could be a panacea for the issues facing the United States. This type of thinking employs the worst kind of nostalgic propaganda because it harkens back to a halcyon past that never existed, one wherein the private sector worked without interference from government to correct social ills. Situating this issue in the time stream of American history provides context for the contemporary political debates surrounding this issue. [Symposium presentation]en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:05:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:05:38Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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