The Impact of Technology in the Medication Use Process: An Area in Need of Nursing Research

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163334
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Impact of Technology in the Medication Use Process: An Area in Need of Nursing Research
Author(s):
Curran, Christine R.
Author Details:
Christine R. Curran, PhD, RN, Senior Scientist, Center for Excellence in Nursing Practice, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: Ccurran3@partners.org
Abstract:
Purpose: To assess the state of the science for nursing on technology's impact in medication delivery. To recognize and understand how these current technologies are likely to evolve. Background: Over 3 billion prescriptions are written annually. A significant portion of clinical nurses' time is spent in the management and delivery of medications to patients. While technology is known to reduce errors, it is also a source of new errors and altered workloads. Understanding how and where medication use technology is best applied is key for implementation of these systems. Approach: Existing technologies used to support the process of medication administration will be highlighted along with their benefits and detriments. Areas within the medication use processes that are ripe for technology will be explored. Technologies under development will be shared and the potential impact of their use discussed. Major Points & Rationale: Technology has a far-reaching impact and therefore must be viewed and defined broadly. A technology used "upstream" in the medication delivery process may have an impact well "downstream" with or without a connection made to this technology as a source of error or process revision. For example, a technology targeted to address other clinicians' needs frequently impacts nurses' workloads without consideration to this phenomenon in the overall medication delivery process. Conclusions: While technology has revolutionized the dispensing process, this is not true for all components of the medication process. Computerized provider order entry systems are known to significantly reduce some medication errors, yet few hospitals have this technology installed, and little is known about their impact on nurses' workloads. Bar-coding technologies for administration of medications are now paramount. Medication administration is an area where a significant number of errors occur and where nursing plays the major role. Nursing research on the impact of these new technologies is critically needed. [Symposium presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Impact of Technology in the Medication Use Process: An Area in Need of Nursing Researchen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCurran, Christine R.en_US
dc.author.detailsChristine R. Curran, PhD, RN, Senior Scientist, Center for Excellence in Nursing Practice, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: Ccurran3@partners.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163334-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To assess the state of the science for nursing on technology's impact in medication delivery. To recognize and understand how these current technologies are likely to evolve. Background: Over 3 billion prescriptions are written annually. A significant portion of clinical nurses' time is spent in the management and delivery of medications to patients. While technology is known to reduce errors, it is also a source of new errors and altered workloads. Understanding how and where medication use technology is best applied is key for implementation of these systems. Approach: Existing technologies used to support the process of medication administration will be highlighted along with their benefits and detriments. Areas within the medication use processes that are ripe for technology will be explored. Technologies under development will be shared and the potential impact of their use discussed. Major Points & Rationale: Technology has a far-reaching impact and therefore must be viewed and defined broadly. A technology used "upstream" in the medication delivery process may have an impact well "downstream" with or without a connection made to this technology as a source of error or process revision. For example, a technology targeted to address other clinicians' needs frequently impacts nurses' workloads without consideration to this phenomenon in the overall medication delivery process. Conclusions: While technology has revolutionized the dispensing process, this is not true for all components of the medication process. Computerized provider order entry systems are known to significantly reduce some medication errors, yet few hospitals have this technology installed, and little is known about their impact on nurses' workloads. Bar-coding technologies for administration of medications are now paramount. Medication administration is an area where a significant number of errors occur and where nursing plays the major role. Nursing research on the impact of these new technologies is critically needed. [Symposium presentation]en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:05:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:05:39Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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