Neighborhood Practices: Nurses as Wives and Mothers in Early Twentieth Century America

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163337
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Neighborhood Practices: Nurses as Wives and Mothers in Early Twentieth Century America
Author(s):
D'Antonio, Patricia
Author Details:
Patricia D'Antonio, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: dantonio@nursing.upenn.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: This study examines the practice of nursing in the lives of nurses who also worked as wives and mothers in communities across the United States. Background: This study seeks to capture the as yet unanalyzed experiences of some 70-80% of the nursing profession who followed a fairly typical life-cycle path. These nurses worked before they married. They then left the workforce while raising their children and sometimes returned when their children left home. Methods (sources, analytic approach): This study draws from training school alumnae association surveys and from personal diaries and reminiscences of nurses throughout the United States. It tracks approximately 30 married nurses through almost four decades of their lives. It interprets such data within an historiographical framework of women's rather than health care history. Results: This study finds that historical nursing practice allowed women to marry at older ages, have smaller families, and pursue more advanced education than American women in general. It also finds that nursing practice provided an important economic safety-net, particularly in its patterns of part-time and intermittent employment. Nursing practice also allowed certain women the opportunity to imagine themselves in new roles and relationships beyond those available in their local communities. As importantly, these women's nursing backgrounds placed them at the center of both formal and informal treatment networks between and among lay women at home and physicians in hospitals. Conclusions and Implications: Nurses who also worked as wives, mothers, and neighbors participated in the construction of a rather fluid social space that responded fairly well to the complicated, and often quite personal, negotiations among a mother's ambition, a child's needs, the value of a husband's work, and the unpredictability of certain economic and social realities both at particular moments and over the course of a lifetime. They also helped create informal care and treatment networks that have, as yet, gone unnoticed and unanalyzed. [Symposium presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNeighborhood Practices: Nurses as Wives and Mothers in Early Twentieth Century Americaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorD'Antonio, Patriciaen_US
dc.author.detailsPatricia D'Antonio, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: dantonio@nursing.upenn.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163337-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This study examines the practice of nursing in the lives of nurses who also worked as wives and mothers in communities across the United States. Background: This study seeks to capture the as yet unanalyzed experiences of some 70-80% of the nursing profession who followed a fairly typical life-cycle path. These nurses worked before they married. They then left the workforce while raising their children and sometimes returned when their children left home. Methods (sources, analytic approach): This study draws from training school alumnae association surveys and from personal diaries and reminiscences of nurses throughout the United States. It tracks approximately 30 married nurses through almost four decades of their lives. It interprets such data within an historiographical framework of women's rather than health care history. Results: This study finds that historical nursing practice allowed women to marry at older ages, have smaller families, and pursue more advanced education than American women in general. It also finds that nursing practice provided an important economic safety-net, particularly in its patterns of part-time and intermittent employment. Nursing practice also allowed certain women the opportunity to imagine themselves in new roles and relationships beyond those available in their local communities. As importantly, these women's nursing backgrounds placed them at the center of both formal and informal treatment networks between and among lay women at home and physicians in hospitals. Conclusions and Implications: Nurses who also worked as wives, mothers, and neighbors participated in the construction of a rather fluid social space that responded fairly well to the complicated, and often quite personal, negotiations among a mother's ambition, a child's needs, the value of a husband's work, and the unpredictability of certain economic and social realities both at particular moments and over the course of a lifetime. They also helped create informal care and treatment networks that have, as yet, gone unnoticed and unanalyzed. [Symposium presentation]en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:05:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:05:43Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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