2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163338
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Measuring the Work Environment in Long Term Care
Author(s):
Dickson, Geri; Moles, Dan
Author Details:
Geri Dickson, PhD, RN, Executive Director, New Jersey Collaborating Center for Nursing, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: gdickson@rutgers.edu; Dan Moles, MPS, BBA, RN
Abstract:
Purpose: The Nursing Work Index-Revised (NWI-R) has been invaluable as a measure of work environment in hospital outcomes research. Recently, the National Quality Forum endorsed the NWI-R for use across all practice settings. The purpose of this study was to determine the applicability of the NWI-R as a measure of the work environment in nursing homes. Theoretical Framework: Sociological theories propose that work environment traits in healthcare facilities reflecting a professional model of workforce organization are highly valued by nurses, in that these traits are essential to the support of their professional practice. Moreover, these highly valued traits are proposed to enhance positive nurse and patient outcomes. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): For this descriptive correlational study, researchers collaborated with a professional organization representing nursing homes, distributing 800 research packets across 80 facilities. A response rate of 47% produced a sample of 214 registered nurses (RNs) and 164 practical nurses (LPNs). Using a 4-point scale, respondents rated the degree they valued traits depicted on the NWI-R as important to their practice. Descriptive statistics and analysis of variance were utilized in the analysis. Results: Of the 49 traits on the NWI-R, 89.7% had a mean "importance score" of 3.0 or higher among LPNs, and 97.9% had a mean score of 3.0 or higher among RNs. Although six of the ten traits most highly valued by RNs were also among the ten most highly valued by LPNs, the mean importance score for the total instrument was significantly higher among RNs. Conclusions and Implications: The NWI-R appears to be an applicable measure of work environment traits highly valued by both LPNs and RNs practicing in nursing homes. These findings, supporting the content validity of the measure in nursing homes, facilitate future research investigating the impact of work environment on nurse and patient outcomes in nursing homes. [Symposium presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeasuring the Work Environment in Long Term Careen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDickson, Gerien_US
dc.contributor.authorMoles, Danen_US
dc.author.detailsGeri Dickson, PhD, RN, Executive Director, New Jersey Collaborating Center for Nursing, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: gdickson@rutgers.edu; Dan Moles, MPS, BBA, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163338-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The Nursing Work Index-Revised (NWI-R) has been invaluable as a measure of work environment in hospital outcomes research. Recently, the National Quality Forum endorsed the NWI-R for use across all practice settings. The purpose of this study was to determine the applicability of the NWI-R as a measure of the work environment in nursing homes. Theoretical Framework: Sociological theories propose that work environment traits in healthcare facilities reflecting a professional model of workforce organization are highly valued by nurses, in that these traits are essential to the support of their professional practice. Moreover, these highly valued traits are proposed to enhance positive nurse and patient outcomes. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): For this descriptive correlational study, researchers collaborated with a professional organization representing nursing homes, distributing 800 research packets across 80 facilities. A response rate of 47% produced a sample of 214 registered nurses (RNs) and 164 practical nurses (LPNs). Using a 4-point scale, respondents rated the degree they valued traits depicted on the NWI-R as important to their practice. Descriptive statistics and analysis of variance were utilized in the analysis. Results: Of the 49 traits on the NWI-R, 89.7% had a mean "importance score" of 3.0 or higher among LPNs, and 97.9% had a mean score of 3.0 or higher among RNs. Although six of the ten traits most highly valued by RNs were also among the ten most highly valued by LPNs, the mean importance score for the total instrument was significantly higher among RNs. Conclusions and Implications: The NWI-R appears to be an applicable measure of work environment traits highly valued by both LPNs and RNs practicing in nursing homes. These findings, supporting the content validity of the measure in nursing homes, facilitate future research investigating the impact of work environment on nurse and patient outcomes in nursing homes. [Symposium presentation]en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:05:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:05:44Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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