2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163339
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Validating Nursing Science: Conceptual Models in Informatics Development
Author(s):
Dluhy, Nancy M.
Author Details:
Nancy M. Dluhy, PhD, RN, Professor, University of Massachusetts Adult & Child Nursing, North Dartmouth, Massachusetts, USA, email: ndluhy@umassd.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Two conceptual frameworks, the Clinical Decision-Making Model (CDMM) and the Novice Clinical Reasoning Model (NCRM) were constructed as a foundation to N-CODES. These models provided a common language for the nursing/engineering team, revealed the natural flow of clinical judgment, and guided knowledge structure. Background: Decision support systems (DSS) are evaluated positively in artificial settings yet not widely accepted in practice. However, empirical data continues to support the benefit of a DSS at the point of care. Conceptualizing clinical judgment provides a means to address utility and acceptability to nursing practice from the inception of the design. Approach: A pluralistic approach directed a synthesis of extensive conceptual and empirical literature relating to decision-making and novice skill development. The iterative process among team members expert in decision-making, theory synthesis, and clinical practice proved highly effective. Major Points & Rationale: Using the model as a framework, the complexity of the process was revealed and undesired outcomes such as linear, prescriptive decision paths were avoided. Pre-encounter data, ample working knowledge, pattern recognition and a sense of saliency emerged as essential for effective clinical judgment. The N-CODES prototype simulates the processes in practice that traditionally assist the novice in developing clinical judgment. The system is constantly available, with cues and cautions, diminishing the novice's cognitive and emotional barriers. Innovative aspects of the models include an emphasis on context, anticipation and control of risk, identification of triggers to hypothesis generation, and 'knowing the patient'. Conclusions: Conceptualizing nurse's clinical judgment proved valuable when working with a diverse multidisciplinary team. A normative model cannot depict all the elements of practice, yet begins to distinguish key facets of a complex process. Conceptualizing and attending to the natural flow of practice is essential to the development and integration of informatics in practice. [Symposium presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleValidating Nursing Science: Conceptual Models in Informatics Developmenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorDluhy, Nancy M.en_US
dc.author.detailsNancy M. Dluhy, PhD, RN, Professor, University of Massachusetts Adult & Child Nursing, North Dartmouth, Massachusetts, USA, email: ndluhy@umassd.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163339-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Two conceptual frameworks, the Clinical Decision-Making Model (CDMM) and the Novice Clinical Reasoning Model (NCRM) were constructed as a foundation to N-CODES. These models provided a common language for the nursing/engineering team, revealed the natural flow of clinical judgment, and guided knowledge structure. Background: Decision support systems (DSS) are evaluated positively in artificial settings yet not widely accepted in practice. However, empirical data continues to support the benefit of a DSS at the point of care. Conceptualizing clinical judgment provides a means to address utility and acceptability to nursing practice from the inception of the design. Approach: A pluralistic approach directed a synthesis of extensive conceptual and empirical literature relating to decision-making and novice skill development. The iterative process among team members expert in decision-making, theory synthesis, and clinical practice proved highly effective. Major Points & Rationale: Using the model as a framework, the complexity of the process was revealed and undesired outcomes such as linear, prescriptive decision paths were avoided. Pre-encounter data, ample working knowledge, pattern recognition and a sense of saliency emerged as essential for effective clinical judgment. The N-CODES prototype simulates the processes in practice that traditionally assist the novice in developing clinical judgment. The system is constantly available, with cues and cautions, diminishing the novice's cognitive and emotional barriers. Innovative aspects of the models include an emphasis on context, anticipation and control of risk, identification of triggers to hypothesis generation, and 'knowing the patient'. Conclusions: Conceptualizing nurse's clinical judgment proved valuable when working with a diverse multidisciplinary team. A normative model cannot depict all the elements of practice, yet begins to distinguish key facets of a complex process. Conceptualizing and attending to the natural flow of practice is essential to the development and integration of informatics in practice. [Symposium presentation]en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:05:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:05:45Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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