Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Medication Administration System - Nurses' Assessment of Satisfaction (MAS-NAS)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163342
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Medication Administration System - Nurses' Assessment of Satisfaction (MAS-NAS)
Author(s):
Duffy, Mary E.; Hurley, Ann C.; Hayes, Judy; Bane, Anne; Griffin, Martha; Lancaster, Diane R.; Poon, Eric G.; Gandhi, Tejal K.
Author Details:
Mary E. Duffy, PhD, RN, Director, Boston College Nursing Research Center, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, USA, email: Mary.Duffy.1@bc.edu; Ann C. Hurley, RN, DNSc; Judy Hayes; Anne Bane; Martha Griffin; Diane R. Lancaster, RN, PhD; Eric G. Poon, MD, MPH; Tejal K. Gandhi, MD
Abstract:
Purpose: To describe the development and testing of the Medication Administration System - Nurses' Assessment of Satisfaction (MAS-NAS) scale. Theoretical Framework: Classical Measurement Theory -- applied to nursing by Waltz, Strickland and Lenz (2005). Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Elements integral to the professional role in medication administration and goals of an integrated system using barcode/eMAR technology drove item development. Individual items were judged for content validity and readability. The MAS-NAS was examined with nurses who did (N=33) and did not (N=81) use an integrated system to learn if the MAS-NAS exhibited reliability and validity indicators considered adequate for a new scale. The 18-item scale was examined using a principal components factor analysis with varimax rotation. Derived subscales were examined for reliability by Cronbach's alpha and paired t-tests. Results: Three factors (efficacy, safety, and access) emerged, confirmed the operational definition of the MAS-NAS, and formed internally consistent subscales (a = .77, .76, and .71 respectively). The MAS-NAS overall alpha was .86. Retest stability was excellent (Pearson r = .70, p. < .001 and paired t-test = 0.30, p. = .76). Conclusions and Implications: The MAS-NAS can evaluate quantitatively the degree to which a medication administration system promotes safe and efficient professional nursing practice, which is important to hospital based nurses who spend between 30-40% of their time in the medication administration process. Systems designed to be technologically effective may not be so perceived by users, and may lead nurses to create "work-arounds" to bypass hospital protocols or procedures to expedite getting drugs to patients and risk patient safety by creating "potential accidents in the making." Assessing nurses' satisfaction with the medication administration system and identifying and ameliorating problems will prevent nurses from resorting to "work-arounds." [Symposium presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDevelopment and Psychometric Evaluation of the Medication Administration System - Nurses' Assessment of Satisfaction (MAS-NAS)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorDuffy, Mary E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHurley, Ann C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHayes, Judyen_US
dc.contributor.authorBane, Anneen_US
dc.contributor.authorGriffin, Marthaen_US
dc.contributor.authorLancaster, Diane R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPoon, Eric G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGandhi, Tejal K.en_US
dc.author.detailsMary E. Duffy, PhD, RN, Director, Boston College Nursing Research Center, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, USA, email: Mary.Duffy.1@bc.edu; Ann C. Hurley, RN, DNSc; Judy Hayes; Anne Bane; Martha Griffin; Diane R. Lancaster, RN, PhD; Eric G. Poon, MD, MPH; Tejal K. Gandhi, MDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163342-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To describe the development and testing of the Medication Administration System - Nurses' Assessment of Satisfaction (MAS-NAS) scale. Theoretical Framework: Classical Measurement Theory -- applied to nursing by Waltz, Strickland and Lenz (2005). Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Elements integral to the professional role in medication administration and goals of an integrated system using barcode/eMAR technology drove item development. Individual items were judged for content validity and readability. The MAS-NAS was examined with nurses who did (N=33) and did not (N=81) use an integrated system to learn if the MAS-NAS exhibited reliability and validity indicators considered adequate for a new scale. The 18-item scale was examined using a principal components factor analysis with varimax rotation. Derived subscales were examined for reliability by Cronbach's alpha and paired t-tests. Results: Three factors (efficacy, safety, and access) emerged, confirmed the operational definition of the MAS-NAS, and formed internally consistent subscales (a = .77, .76, and .71 respectively). The MAS-NAS overall alpha was .86. Retest stability was excellent (Pearson r = .70, p. < .001 and paired t-test = 0.30, p. = .76). Conclusions and Implications: The MAS-NAS can evaluate quantitatively the degree to which a medication administration system promotes safe and efficient professional nursing practice, which is important to hospital based nurses who spend between 30-40% of their time in the medication administration process. Systems designed to be technologically effective may not be so perceived by users, and may lead nurses to create "work-arounds" to bypass hospital protocols or procedures to expedite getting drugs to patients and risk patient safety by creating "potential accidents in the making." Assessing nurses' satisfaction with the medication administration system and identifying and ameliorating problems will prevent nurses from resorting to "work-arounds." [Symposium presentation]en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:05:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:05:48Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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