2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163343
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Beyond the Five Rights: Nurses' Thinking during Medication Administration
Author(s):
Eisenhauer, Laurel A.; Hurley, Ann C.; Dolan, Nancy V.; Bane, Anne; Griffin, Martha
Author Details:
Laurel A. Eisenhauer, PhD, RN, Senior Scientist, Boston College Center for Excellence in Nursing Practice, Newton, Massachusetts, USA, email: laurel.eisenhauer@bc.edu; Ann C. Hurley, RN, DNSc; Nancy V. Dolan; Anne Bane; Martha Griffin
Abstract:
Purpose: To identify the critical thinking processes of hospital based nurses related to medication administration. Background: The nursing role goes beyond simply following the "5-rights" of medication administration, but is complex and many-faceted. Nurses are the last link in the safety net to prevent adverse events, yet the thought processes nurses use during the medication administration process have had limited study. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): A sample of 34 nurses in a tertiary care teaching hospital were interviewed using a semi structured guide to elicit their specific thoughts during the medication administration process. Interviews were transcribed, entered into NVivo, coded after a 2-person consensus, analyzed, and used to identify themes. Results: Situations requiring judgment in dosage, timing, or selection of specific medications (e.g., pain management, titration of antihypertensives) provided the most explicit data. Major categories related to: 1. Assessment. Direct patient observation and review of pertinent data before and after medication administration 2. Thinking processes. Interpretation of patient data and application of knowledge to specific patient situations, including anticipation in relation to a patient's clinical trajectory. 3. Collaboration. Consultation with other nurses, pharmacists and physicians led to verification of data interpretation, patient advocacy, and prevention of medication errors and/or adverse drug events. Conclusions and Implications: Nurses' thinking processes extend beyond rules and procedures and use patient data and interdisciplinary professional knowledge to provide safe and effective care. A major difficulty in studying thinking processes was the difficulty of recall and the rapidity and multitasking nature of their thinking, especially in a fast-paced and constantly changing clinical environment. Identification of thinking processes can help nurses to explain the professional expertise inherent in medication administration that go beyond the technical use of the "5 rights" and provide empirically derived content for nursing curriculum and staff education programs. [Symposium presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBeyond the Five Rights: Nurses' Thinking during Medication Administrationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEisenhauer, Laurel A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHurley, Ann C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDolan, Nancy V.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBane, Anneen_US
dc.contributor.authorGriffin, Marthaen_US
dc.author.detailsLaurel A. Eisenhauer, PhD, RN, Senior Scientist, Boston College Center for Excellence in Nursing Practice, Newton, Massachusetts, USA, email: laurel.eisenhauer@bc.edu; Ann C. Hurley, RN, DNSc; Nancy V. Dolan; Anne Bane; Martha Griffinen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163343-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To identify the critical thinking processes of hospital based nurses related to medication administration. Background: The nursing role goes beyond simply following the "5-rights" of medication administration, but is complex and many-faceted. Nurses are the last link in the safety net to prevent adverse events, yet the thought processes nurses use during the medication administration process have had limited study. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): A sample of 34 nurses in a tertiary care teaching hospital were interviewed using a semi structured guide to elicit their specific thoughts during the medication administration process. Interviews were transcribed, entered into NVivo, coded after a 2-person consensus, analyzed, and used to identify themes. Results: Situations requiring judgment in dosage, timing, or selection of specific medications (e.g., pain management, titration of antihypertensives) provided the most explicit data. Major categories related to: 1. Assessment. Direct patient observation and review of pertinent data before and after medication administration 2. Thinking processes. Interpretation of patient data and application of knowledge to specific patient situations, including anticipation in relation to a patient's clinical trajectory. 3. Collaboration. Consultation with other nurses, pharmacists and physicians led to verification of data interpretation, patient advocacy, and prevention of medication errors and/or adverse drug events. Conclusions and Implications: Nurses' thinking processes extend beyond rules and procedures and use patient data and interdisciplinary professional knowledge to provide safe and effective care. A major difficulty in studying thinking processes was the difficulty of recall and the rapidity and multitasking nature of their thinking, especially in a fast-paced and constantly changing clinical environment. Identification of thinking processes can help nurses to explain the professional expertise inherent in medication administration that go beyond the technical use of the "5 rights" and provide empirically derived content for nursing curriculum and staff education programs. [Symposium presentation]en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:05:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:05:50Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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