2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163344
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Diagnosis (in) Perilous?
Author(s):
Fairman, Julie
Author Details:
Julie Fairman, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: fairman@nursing.upenn.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: This paper uses the historical experiences of nurse practitioners to rethink the positionality of diagnosis in patients' illness experience, and questions its contemporary relevance. The narrative will situate the growing challenge to prioritization of diagnosis in clinical practice and present a standpoint for rethinking how and by whom patient illness experiences are categorized and labeled. Background: The process of diagnosis "both the private act of arriving at a label for an array of patient complaints and the public disclosure and naming of particular illness" has long been assumed to be a central and therapeutic event in the patient's illness experience and in clinical practice. Physicians traditionally were analytically positioned to control the diagnostic process, and thus the political, cultural and institutional resources associated with illness. Methods (sources, analytic approach): This work uses the historical method, particularly the analysis of the oral histories of pioneer nurse practitioners to illustrate the changing boundaries of clinical thinking, and in particular, the process of diagnosis. Results: Individual, social, and cultural processes of actually experiencing illness may be more enduring, and subsequently more important to the patient and family than the process of naming or labeling. Naming a cluster of symptoms such as shortness of breath and fatigue as "congestive heart failure" admittedly helps decide treatment, predict prognosis, and unlock resources; but it also tells us little about the individual's and, even more important, the family's interpretations, needs, and resources. Conclusions and Implications: Diagnosis may in fact be part of the broader process of clinical care rather than the central event in the illness experience. Situating the act of diagnosis in this way is particularly relevant given the changing demographics of patients and their illness trajectory, and in the growing participation of many parties, including government institutions, insurers, nurses and patients, in the diagnostic process. [Symposium presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDiagnosis (in) Perilous?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorFairman, Julieen_US
dc.author.detailsJulie Fairman, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: fairman@nursing.upenn.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163344-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This paper uses the historical experiences of nurse practitioners to rethink the positionality of diagnosis in patients' illness experience, and questions its contemporary relevance. The narrative will situate the growing challenge to prioritization of diagnosis in clinical practice and present a standpoint for rethinking how and by whom patient illness experiences are categorized and labeled. Background: The process of diagnosis "both the private act of arriving at a label for an array of patient complaints and the public disclosure and naming of particular illness" has long been assumed to be a central and therapeutic event in the patient's illness experience and in clinical practice. Physicians traditionally were analytically positioned to control the diagnostic process, and thus the political, cultural and institutional resources associated with illness. Methods (sources, analytic approach): This work uses the historical method, particularly the analysis of the oral histories of pioneer nurse practitioners to illustrate the changing boundaries of clinical thinking, and in particular, the process of diagnosis. Results: Individual, social, and cultural processes of actually experiencing illness may be more enduring, and subsequently more important to the patient and family than the process of naming or labeling. Naming a cluster of symptoms such as shortness of breath and fatigue as "congestive heart failure" admittedly helps decide treatment, predict prognosis, and unlock resources; but it also tells us little about the individual's and, even more important, the family's interpretations, needs, and resources. Conclusions and Implications: Diagnosis may in fact be part of the broader process of clinical care rather than the central event in the illness experience. Situating the act of diagnosis in this way is particularly relevant given the changing demographics of patients and their illness trajectory, and in the growing participation of many parties, including government institutions, insurers, nurses and patients, in the diagnostic process. [Symposium presentation]en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:05:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:05:51Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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