2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163345
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of the Work Environment on Home Health Outcomes
Author(s):
Flynn, Linda
Author Details:
Linda Flynn, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, Rutgers University College of Nursing, NJ Collaborating Center for Nursing, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: lflynn@rutgers.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Although a considerable amount of research has investigated the impact of the hospital work environment on staff and patient outcomes, little is known regarding the relationship between work environment and outcomes in home healthcare agencies. The purpose of this study, funded by an intramural grant, was to explore the impact of work environment traits on key nurse and patient outcomes in home care. Theoretical Framework: Sociological theories posit that nurse work environments in hospitals and other health care organizations characterized by interdisciplinary collaboration, nurse autonomy, adequate resources, and administrative support will experience higher levels of staff satisfaction and superior patient outcomes. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): This descriptive correlational study utilized Dillman mail survey methods to obtain a 52% response rate from randomly selected subscribers to a professional nursing journal. Data were collected from a sample of 137 home care staff nurses representing 38 different states. Survey packets contained the Nursing Work Index-R as a measure of the nursing work environment, as well as items designed to measure job satisfaction, quality of care, workload, frequencies of patient-administered medication errors, and frequencies of uncontrolled pain among patients in their caseloads. Multiple regression techniques were used to determine individual and combined effects. Results: As anticipated, a supportive work environment was inversely related to the frequency of patient-administered medication errors and uncontrolled pain. Work environment explained 11% of the variance in uncontrolled pain, regardless of workload. Moreover, work environment and assessed quality of care explained 15% of the variance in nurse job satisfaction. Conclusions and Implications: As in hospitals, creation of work environments in home care agencies that support clinicians and their practice appears to be important in reducing adverse patient events such as uncontrolled pain and self-medication errors. Moreover, work environment appears to be an important determinant of nurses' job satisfaction. [Symposium presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpact of the Work Environment on Home Health Outcomesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFlynn, Lindaen_US
dc.author.detailsLinda Flynn, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, Rutgers University College of Nursing, NJ Collaborating Center for Nursing, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: lflynn@rutgers.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163345-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Although a considerable amount of research has investigated the impact of the hospital work environment on staff and patient outcomes, little is known regarding the relationship between work environment and outcomes in home healthcare agencies. The purpose of this study, funded by an intramural grant, was to explore the impact of work environment traits on key nurse and patient outcomes in home care. Theoretical Framework: Sociological theories posit that nurse work environments in hospitals and other health care organizations characterized by interdisciplinary collaboration, nurse autonomy, adequate resources, and administrative support will experience higher levels of staff satisfaction and superior patient outcomes. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): This descriptive correlational study utilized Dillman mail survey methods to obtain a 52% response rate from randomly selected subscribers to a professional nursing journal. Data were collected from a sample of 137 home care staff nurses representing 38 different states. Survey packets contained the Nursing Work Index-R as a measure of the nursing work environment, as well as items designed to measure job satisfaction, quality of care, workload, frequencies of patient-administered medication errors, and frequencies of uncontrolled pain among patients in their caseloads. Multiple regression techniques were used to determine individual and combined effects. Results: As anticipated, a supportive work environment was inversely related to the frequency of patient-administered medication errors and uncontrolled pain. Work environment explained 11% of the variance in uncontrolled pain, regardless of workload. Moreover, work environment and assessed quality of care explained 15% of the variance in nurse job satisfaction. Conclusions and Implications: As in hospitals, creation of work environments in home care agencies that support clinicians and their practice appears to be important in reducing adverse patient events such as uncontrolled pain and self-medication errors. Moreover, work environment appears to be an important determinant of nurses' job satisfaction. [Symposium presentation]en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:05:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:05:52Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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