2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163346
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Measuring Sleep in Acute Care: Methodological Challenges
Author(s):
Hedges, Christine; Redeker, Nancy S.
Author Details:
Christine Hedges, PhD, RN, APRN, BC, Nurse Researcher, Ann May Center for Nursing, Neptune, New Jersey, USA, email: chedges@meridianhealth.com; Nancy S. Redeker, PhD, RN
Abstract:
Purpose: The importance of sleep in the acute care setting is well established. However, multiple factors, including illness, medications, pain, unfamiliar environment, and pre-existing sleep patterns influence sleep in the acute care setting and pose unique challenges to its measurement. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the strengths, limitations, and feasibility of methods of sleep measurement in the acute care environment. Theoretical Framework: Sleep is a dynamic, multidimensional biobehavioral circadian and homeostatic phenomenon. Multiple environmental, clinical, and behavioral factors influence sleep in the acute care environment. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A variety of methods have been used to measure sleep in the acute care setting, including sleep diaries and questionnaires, nursing observations, wrist actigraphs, and polysomnography. We will explore the benefits and limitations of these methods, as well as practical strategies for obtaining reliable, valid, and precise data and recommend measurement strategies. Examples will be provided from our work with recovering cardiac surgery patients. Results: The dynamic and circadian nature of sleep and activity-rest during acute care recovery suggest the need for sleep measurement strategies that account for rapid changes in patient status and temporal changes in sleep. Patient acuity presents challenges to participant adherence with study methods, and the fast-paced nature of the acute care environment with many patient care interactions suggests the need for methods that are minimally intrusive on patient care activities, but also the need to be vigilant in assuring compliance with study protocols. Conclusions and Implications: A variety of sleep measurement methods are appropriate for use in the acute care setting. Choice of measurement strategy is influenced by the reliability, validity, and precision of the instruments, but also by patient and environmental considerations. [Symposium presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeasuring Sleep in Acute Care: Methodological Challengesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHedges, Christineen_US
dc.contributor.authorRedeker, Nancy S.en_US
dc.author.detailsChristine Hedges, PhD, RN, APRN, BC, Nurse Researcher, Ann May Center for Nursing, Neptune, New Jersey, USA, email: chedges@meridianhealth.com; Nancy S. Redeker, PhD, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163346-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The importance of sleep in the acute care setting is well established. However, multiple factors, including illness, medications, pain, unfamiliar environment, and pre-existing sleep patterns influence sleep in the acute care setting and pose unique challenges to its measurement. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the strengths, limitations, and feasibility of methods of sleep measurement in the acute care environment. Theoretical Framework: Sleep is a dynamic, multidimensional biobehavioral circadian and homeostatic phenomenon. Multiple environmental, clinical, and behavioral factors influence sleep in the acute care environment. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A variety of methods have been used to measure sleep in the acute care setting, including sleep diaries and questionnaires, nursing observations, wrist actigraphs, and polysomnography. We will explore the benefits and limitations of these methods, as well as practical strategies for obtaining reliable, valid, and precise data and recommend measurement strategies. Examples will be provided from our work with recovering cardiac surgery patients. Results: The dynamic and circadian nature of sleep and activity-rest during acute care recovery suggest the need for sleep measurement strategies that account for rapid changes in patient status and temporal changes in sleep. Patient acuity presents challenges to participant adherence with study methods, and the fast-paced nature of the acute care environment with many patient care interactions suggests the need for methods that are minimally intrusive on patient care activities, but also the need to be vigilant in assuring compliance with study protocols. Conclusions and Implications: A variety of sleep measurement methods are appropriate for use in the acute care setting. Choice of measurement strategy is influenced by the reliability, validity, and precision of the instruments, but also by patient and environmental considerations. [Symposium presentation]en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:05:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:05:53Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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