2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163347
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perceptions about the Medication Administration Process
Author(s):
Hurley, Ann C.; Dolan, Nancy V.; Hayes, Judy; Bane, Anne; Griffin, Martha
Author Details:
Ann C. Hurley, RN, DNSc, Director, Center for Excellence in Nursing Research, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: Ahurley@partners.org; Nancy V. Dolan; Judy Hayes; Anne Bane; Martha Griffin
Abstract:
Purpose: To describe perspectives of key stakeholders (nurses, patients, families, pharmacists and physicians) regarding the process of medication administration. Background: Many hospitals are considering barcode/eMAR technology to reduce errors. But little is known about opinions and beliefs held by those who would be served by, rely on or use new medication administration technology. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): Grounded Theory methods guided data collection and analysis. Semi structured interviews were conducted with 64 diverse stakeholders from medical and surgical intermediate and intensive care units and pre and post partum units in a tertiary care hospital that did not use point of care bar-code technology. Steps included: entering transcribed interviews into the NVivo software package, concurrently coding and obtaining consensus on definitions and developing the code book, confirming coded text, developing descriptive categories, examining codes and categories within and across stakeholders, and exploring emergent themes. Results: Professionals told stories that focused on procedures, thought processes, and communication/collaboration that included categories of timing, checking, safety, availability of medications; patients' needs and actual/potential responses; and system issues. One code, checking the patient's identification band, illustrated different practices between critical care and other nurses and interpretations by patients and families "once or twice we've had someone who could possibly not know she's the patient who deserves that medicine." One theme, safety-timeliness, revealed the tension between using a system as designed versus bypassing to expedite getting drugs to patients "The problems occur if the patient needs a medication immediately, then we generally don't take the time to enter the order into the computer." A model illustrating thematic relationships will be described. Purpose: Media coverage of President Bush's "charitable choice" initiative often frames this agenda as an innovative "new" collaboration between the public and private sectors. This paper is a comparative case study of early twentieth century nurses funded privately through the New York City Association for Improving the Conditions of the Poor's [AICP] Bureau of Nursing Services [BNS], to the practice of publicly funded nurses. Conclusions and Implications: This is one of the first studies to learn concurrently the perceptions of health care professionals who strive to assure that patients are given correct medications, patients who receive medications, and family members who support patients during their hospitalization. [Symposium presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerceptions about the Medication Administration Processen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHurley, Ann C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDolan, Nancy V.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHayes, Judyen_US
dc.contributor.authorBane, Anneen_US
dc.contributor.authorGriffin, Marthaen_US
dc.author.detailsAnn C. Hurley, RN, DNSc, Director, Center for Excellence in Nursing Research, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: Ahurley@partners.org; Nancy V. Dolan; Judy Hayes; Anne Bane; Martha Griffinen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163347-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To describe perspectives of key stakeholders (nurses, patients, families, pharmacists and physicians) regarding the process of medication administration. Background: Many hospitals are considering barcode/eMAR technology to reduce errors. But little is known about opinions and beliefs held by those who would be served by, rely on or use new medication administration technology. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): Grounded Theory methods guided data collection and analysis. Semi structured interviews were conducted with 64 diverse stakeholders from medical and surgical intermediate and intensive care units and pre and post partum units in a tertiary care hospital that did not use point of care bar-code technology. Steps included: entering transcribed interviews into the NVivo software package, concurrently coding and obtaining consensus on definitions and developing the code book, confirming coded text, developing descriptive categories, examining codes and categories within and across stakeholders, and exploring emergent themes. Results: Professionals told stories that focused on procedures, thought processes, and communication/collaboration that included categories of timing, checking, safety, availability of medications; patients' needs and actual/potential responses; and system issues. One code, checking the patient's identification band, illustrated different practices between critical care and other nurses and interpretations by patients and families "once or twice we've had someone who could possibly not know she's the patient who deserves that medicine." One theme, safety-timeliness, revealed the tension between using a system as designed versus bypassing to expedite getting drugs to patients "The problems occur if the patient needs a medication immediately, then we generally don't take the time to enter the order into the computer." A model illustrating thematic relationships will be described. Purpose: Media coverage of President Bush's "charitable choice" initiative often frames this agenda as an innovative "new" collaboration between the public and private sectors. This paper is a comparative case study of early twentieth century nurses funded privately through the New York City Association for Improving the Conditions of the Poor's [AICP] Bureau of Nursing Services [BNS], to the practice of publicly funded nurses. Conclusions and Implications: This is one of the first studies to learn concurrently the perceptions of health care professionals who strive to assure that patients are given correct medications, patients who receive medications, and family members who support patients during their hospitalization. [Symposium presentation]en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:05:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:05:54Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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