Maintaining Alliances: Testing Practice Theory for Behavioral Symptoms of Dementia

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163348
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Maintaining Alliances: Testing Practice Theory for Behavioral Symptoms of Dementia
Author(s):
Kolanowski, Ann; Fick, Donna M.; Yu, Fang
Author Details:
Ann Kolanowski, PhD, RN, FGSA, Associate Professor, Penn State University School of Nursing, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA, email: amk20@psu.edu; Donna M. Fick, PhD, APRN-BC; Fang Yu, PhD, CRNP, RN
Abstract:
Purpose: The NIH Roadmap encourages multidisciplinary alliances as a way to accelerate progress on important healthcare problems. Agitation and passivity are important behavioral symptoms exhibited by 90% of nursing home residents with dementia because they account for many poor health outcomes and significantly increase the cost of long-term care. This paper reports on the development and testing of a multidisciplinary activity intervention, derived from nursing and recreational therapy science, for responding to these behavioral symptoms. Background: The Need-driven Dementia-compromised Behavior Model was used to derive a multidisciplinary activity intervention which included two prescriptive elements that were hypothesized to improve efficacy of the treatment: activities were matched to each subject's functional ability (recreational therapy science) and style of interest (nursing science). Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): A crossover experimental design was used in which 30 nursing home residents were assigned to one of six possible order-of-condition presentations: activity matched to functional ability, style of interest, or both. Standard instruments were used to take repeated measures of engagement, affect, mood, agitation and passivity from video recordings of 20-minute daily activity sessions conducted for 48 days. Raters were blind to treatment match. The primary analysis method was mixed-model analysis of variance. Results: Under the multidisciplinary activity intervention, subjects demonstrated more engagement (p=.001), more positive affect (p< .001) and less passivity (p< .001) than under the matched to functional ability only condition or baseline. Agitation and negative affect improved under all conditions. There was no change in mood. Conclusions and Implications: The multidisciplinary intervention from nursing and recreational science was more effective for responding to a wider range of outcomes than either of the two discipline-specific interventions. Multidisciplinary alliances are critical for the development of practice theory that supports efficacious interventions. Recommendations for establishing and maintaining these alliances are discussed. [Symposium presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaintaining Alliances: Testing Practice Theory for Behavioral Symptoms of Dementiaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKolanowski, Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorFick, Donna M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorYu, Fangen_US
dc.author.detailsAnn Kolanowski, PhD, RN, FGSA, Associate Professor, Penn State University School of Nursing, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA, email: amk20@psu.edu; Donna M. Fick, PhD, APRN-BC; Fang Yu, PhD, CRNP, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163348-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The NIH Roadmap encourages multidisciplinary alliances as a way to accelerate progress on important healthcare problems. Agitation and passivity are important behavioral symptoms exhibited by 90% of nursing home residents with dementia because they account for many poor health outcomes and significantly increase the cost of long-term care. This paper reports on the development and testing of a multidisciplinary activity intervention, derived from nursing and recreational therapy science, for responding to these behavioral symptoms. Background: The Need-driven Dementia-compromised Behavior Model was used to derive a multidisciplinary activity intervention which included two prescriptive elements that were hypothesized to improve efficacy of the treatment: activities were matched to each subject's functional ability (recreational therapy science) and style of interest (nursing science). Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): A crossover experimental design was used in which 30 nursing home residents were assigned to one of six possible order-of-condition presentations: activity matched to functional ability, style of interest, or both. Standard instruments were used to take repeated measures of engagement, affect, mood, agitation and passivity from video recordings of 20-minute daily activity sessions conducted for 48 days. Raters were blind to treatment match. The primary analysis method was mixed-model analysis of variance. Results: Under the multidisciplinary activity intervention, subjects demonstrated more engagement (p=.001), more positive affect (p< .001) and less passivity (p< .001) than under the matched to functional ability only condition or baseline. Agitation and negative affect improved under all conditions. There was no change in mood. Conclusions and Implications: The multidisciplinary intervention from nursing and recreational science was more effective for responding to a wider range of outcomes than either of the two discipline-specific interventions. Multidisciplinary alliances are critical for the development of practice theory that supports efficacious interventions. Recommendations for establishing and maintaining these alliances are discussed. [Symposium presentation]en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:05:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:05:55Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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