Forging New Alliances: Comparing the Health Status, Beliefs, and Behaviors of Older Men in Prison and the Community

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163351
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Forging New Alliances: Comparing the Health Status, Beliefs, and Behaviors of Older Men in Prison and the Community
Author(s):
Loeb, Susan J.; Kopenhaver Haidet, Kim
Author Details:
Susan J. Loeb, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor of Nursing, Penn State University School of Nursing, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA, email: SVL100@PSU.EDU; Kim Kopenhaver Haidet, PhD, RN, CRNP
Abstract:
Purpose: The Pennsylvania State University, College of Health & Human Development's seed grants aid junior investigators in forging new research collaborations. A pilot study funded through the aforementioned mechanism facilitated the genesis of such a partnership. Despite the fact that the fastest growing subgroup of prison inmates in the U.S. today is men age 50 and older, 85% of whom have two or more major illnesses; little is known about their management of chronic disease or their health-related lifestyles. This paper reports the results of a study undertaken by nursing and sociology researchers, which compares the health status, beliefs, and behaviors of older men in prison and the community. Theoretical Framework: Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory and the concept of self-efficacy were used to theoretically frame the study. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A convenience sample of 51 male inmates and 33 community-dwelling men, age 50 or older, were surveyed for this pilot study. Independent sample t-tests were the primary method of analysis. Results: Prisoners took part in significantly fewer health programs than their community-dwelling counterparts (p< .05) and had significantly lower participation in health promoting behaviors (p< .001). However, there were no significant differences in self-rated health, number of health conditions, or value placed on maintaining health between the two groups despite the fact that the mean age of the community-dwelling men was nearly 15 years older than that of the prisoners. Conclusions and Implications: Findings lend support to the assertion from the literature that prisoners may be 10-15 years older physiologically than chronologically. Finding that older prisoners attended significantly fewer programs and engaged less often in health-promoting behaviors, may be due to lack of availability and opportunity. The interdisciplinary collaboration that brought this pilot research to conclusion continues. Recommendations for identifying potential collaborators, as well as initiating and establishing new partnerships, will be presented. [Symposium presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleForging New Alliances: Comparing the Health Status, Beliefs, and Behaviors of Older Men in Prison and the Communityen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLoeb, Susan J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKopenhaver Haidet, Kimen_US
dc.author.detailsSusan J. Loeb, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor of Nursing, Penn State University School of Nursing, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA, email: SVL100@PSU.EDU; Kim Kopenhaver Haidet, PhD, RN, CRNPen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163351-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The Pennsylvania State University, College of Health & Human Development's seed grants aid junior investigators in forging new research collaborations. A pilot study funded through the aforementioned mechanism facilitated the genesis of such a partnership. Despite the fact that the fastest growing subgroup of prison inmates in the U.S. today is men age 50 and older, 85% of whom have two or more major illnesses; little is known about their management of chronic disease or their health-related lifestyles. This paper reports the results of a study undertaken by nursing and sociology researchers, which compares the health status, beliefs, and behaviors of older men in prison and the community. Theoretical Framework: Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory and the concept of self-efficacy were used to theoretically frame the study. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A convenience sample of 51 male inmates and 33 community-dwelling men, age 50 or older, were surveyed for this pilot study. Independent sample t-tests were the primary method of analysis. Results: Prisoners took part in significantly fewer health programs than their community-dwelling counterparts (p< .05) and had significantly lower participation in health promoting behaviors (p< .001). However, there were no significant differences in self-rated health, number of health conditions, or value placed on maintaining health between the two groups despite the fact that the mean age of the community-dwelling men was nearly 15 years older than that of the prisoners. Conclusions and Implications: Findings lend support to the assertion from the literature that prisoners may be 10-15 years older physiologically than chronologically. Finding that older prisoners attended significantly fewer programs and engaged less often in health-promoting behaviors, may be due to lack of availability and opportunity. The interdisciplinary collaboration that brought this pilot research to conclusion continues. Recommendations for identifying potential collaborators, as well as initiating and establishing new partnerships, will be presented. [Symposium presentation]en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:05:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:05:58Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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