Transdisciplinary Collaboration in Developing Robotic Assistive Technology for Older Adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163352
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Transdisciplinary Collaboration in Developing Robotic Assistive Technology for Older Adults
Author(s):
Matthews, Judith Tabolt; Gordon, Geoffrey J.; Pollack, Martha; Glover, Jared M.; Engberg, Sandra; Rogers, Joan; Thrun, Sebastian
Author Details:
Judith Tabolt Matthews, PhD, MPH, RN, Assistant Professor, University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: jtmatt@pitt.edu; Geoffrey J. Gordon, PhD; Martha Pollack, PhD; Jared M. Glover, BS; Sandra Engberg, PhD, CRNP, RN; Joan Rogers, PhD, OTR; Sebastian Thrun, PhD
Abstract:
Purpose: This presentation focuses on transdisciplinary collaboration within the context of the Nursebot Project, a research and educational initiative aimed at developing robotic assistive technology for older adults. The Model of Health-related Technologies is discussed, as are two areas of potential conflict across disciplines: 1) norms and incentives for technology research and development, and 2) measures of success in laboratory studies of proof-of-concept vs. field studies of usability and efficacy. Background: Developing technological solutions to the myriad challenges of aging requires harnessing the talents and resources of multiple disciplines, organizations, and funding sources. The problems to be addressed are often complex, with physical, psychological, socioeconomic, ethical, and legal dimensions. The technological solutions, correspondingly sophisticated, need ultimately to fit seamlessly into everyday living and enhance the quality of older adults' lives. Approach: Arriving at solutions that not only work but also ameliorate or eliminate an age-related problem involves the iterative process of concept development, prototype design, laboratory evaluation, and field studies. Expertise in a variety of areas is needed, including knowledge of the nature and scope of the problem, understanding of the potential benefit that technology has to offer, and mastery in moving from the design studio to investigation of usability and efficacy. Major Points & Rationale: Experts in aging are rarely well versed in the conceptual and technical aspects of existing and emerging technologies, and expert technologists are not typically familiar with the issues of aging. When alliances comprising multiple disciplines are formed, members quickly discover how their perspectives differ, framed by the language and culture of their disciplines, the settings in which they work, the sponsors of their research, and the methods by which they advance knowledge. Conclusions: These differences, whether subtle or vast, can nevertheless be bridged by common goals and deliberate efforts to enhance mutual understanding. [Symposium presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTransdisciplinary Collaboration in Developing Robotic Assistive Technology for Older Adultsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMatthews, Judith Tabolten_US
dc.contributor.authorGordon, Geoffrey J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPollack, Marthaen_US
dc.contributor.authorGlover, Jared M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEngberg, Sandraen_US
dc.contributor.authorRogers, Joanen_US
dc.contributor.authorThrun, Sebastianen_US
dc.author.detailsJudith Tabolt Matthews, PhD, MPH, RN, Assistant Professor, University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: jtmatt@pitt.edu; Geoffrey J. Gordon, PhD; Martha Pollack, PhD; Jared M. Glover, BS; Sandra Engberg, PhD, CRNP, RN; Joan Rogers, PhD, OTR; Sebastian Thrun, PhDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163352-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This presentation focuses on transdisciplinary collaboration within the context of the Nursebot Project, a research and educational initiative aimed at developing robotic assistive technology for older adults. The Model of Health-related Technologies is discussed, as are two areas of potential conflict across disciplines: 1) norms and incentives for technology research and development, and 2) measures of success in laboratory studies of proof-of-concept vs. field studies of usability and efficacy. Background: Developing technological solutions to the myriad challenges of aging requires harnessing the talents and resources of multiple disciplines, organizations, and funding sources. The problems to be addressed are often complex, with physical, psychological, socioeconomic, ethical, and legal dimensions. The technological solutions, correspondingly sophisticated, need ultimately to fit seamlessly into everyday living and enhance the quality of older adults' lives. Approach: Arriving at solutions that not only work but also ameliorate or eliminate an age-related problem involves the iterative process of concept development, prototype design, laboratory evaluation, and field studies. Expertise in a variety of areas is needed, including knowledge of the nature and scope of the problem, understanding of the potential benefit that technology has to offer, and mastery in moving from the design studio to investigation of usability and efficacy. Major Points & Rationale: Experts in aging are rarely well versed in the conceptual and technical aspects of existing and emerging technologies, and expert technologists are not typically familiar with the issues of aging. When alliances comprising multiple disciplines are formed, members quickly discover how their perspectives differ, framed by the language and culture of their disciplines, the settings in which they work, the sponsors of their research, and the methods by which they advance knowledge. Conclusions: These differences, whether subtle or vast, can nevertheless be bridged by common goals and deliberate efforts to enhance mutual understanding. [Symposium presentation]en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:06:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:06:00Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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