2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163356
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Conceptual And Methodological Underpinnings of Sleep Measurement
Author(s):
Redeker, Nancy S.
Author Details:
Nancy Redeker, Professor, Yale University, West Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: nancy.redeker@yale.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Sleep is a multidimensional biobehavioral phenomenon. A variety of methods are available to measure its dimensions, including polysomnography, wrist actigraphy, sleep diaries, and questionnaires. Recent technological advances present opportunities for sleep recording in non-laboratory settings. The purposes of this presentation are to compare and contrast the conceptual underpinnings and sleep variables obtained with each of these instruments; evaluate measurement properties; and analyze practical issues, costs, and data analytic strategies. Theoretical Framework: The review will be addressed from the perspective that sleep is a multidimensional biobehavioral circadian and homeostatic phenomenon. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A review of literature will be employed. Graphical and tabular displays of data and scoring and data analysis methods will be used for illustration. Results: Each sleep measurement method has properties that elicit specific attributes of sleep, strengths, limitations, and costs. Polysomnography (PSG), the gold standard of sleep measurement, is the primary method for evaluating the physiological attributes of sleep, including cardiorespiratory and neurologic variables necessary to diagnose sleep disorders, such as sleep apnea. Recent technological advances enable acquisition of PSG data in a variety of non-laboratory settings. However, PSG is intrusive, expensive, and scoring requires specialized expertise. Wrist actigraphs provide a behavioral perspective on sleep duration and continuity and activity-rest when used with standardized scoring algorithms and are highly acceptable to research participants. Sleep diaries are reliable and valid daily measures of self-reported sleep duration, continuity, and quality, while several sleep questionnaires are available to evaluate self-reported sleep over a variety of time frames and settings. Conclusions and Implications: Choice of sleep measurement method should be determined by the sleep attributes of interest, the theoretical perspective of the study, the relevant time frame of measurement, and available resources. [Symposium presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleConceptual And Methodological Underpinnings of Sleep Measurementen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRedeker, Nancy S.en_US
dc.author.detailsNancy Redeker, Professor, Yale University, West Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: nancy.redeker@yale.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163356-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Sleep is a multidimensional biobehavioral phenomenon. A variety of methods are available to measure its dimensions, including polysomnography, wrist actigraphy, sleep diaries, and questionnaires. Recent technological advances present opportunities for sleep recording in non-laboratory settings. The purposes of this presentation are to compare and contrast the conceptual underpinnings and sleep variables obtained with each of these instruments; evaluate measurement properties; and analyze practical issues, costs, and data analytic strategies. Theoretical Framework: The review will be addressed from the perspective that sleep is a multidimensional biobehavioral circadian and homeostatic phenomenon. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A review of literature will be employed. Graphical and tabular displays of data and scoring and data analysis methods will be used for illustration. Results: Each sleep measurement method has properties that elicit specific attributes of sleep, strengths, limitations, and costs. Polysomnography (PSG), the gold standard of sleep measurement, is the primary method for evaluating the physiological attributes of sleep, including cardiorespiratory and neurologic variables necessary to diagnose sleep disorders, such as sleep apnea. Recent technological advances enable acquisition of PSG data in a variety of non-laboratory settings. However, PSG is intrusive, expensive, and scoring requires specialized expertise. Wrist actigraphs provide a behavioral perspective on sleep duration and continuity and activity-rest when used with standardized scoring algorithms and are highly acceptable to research participants. Sleep diaries are reliable and valid daily measures of self-reported sleep duration, continuity, and quality, while several sleep questionnaires are available to evaluate self-reported sleep over a variety of time frames and settings. Conclusions and Implications: Choice of sleep measurement method should be determined by the sleep attributes of interest, the theoretical perspective of the study, the relevant time frame of measurement, and available resources. [Symposium presentation]en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:06:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:06:04Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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