Use of Unattended Polysomnography in Stable Heart Failure Patients Sleeping at Home

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163357
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Use of Unattended Polysomnography in Stable Heart Failure Patients Sleeping at Home
Author(s):
Redeker, Nancy S.
Author Details:
Nancy Redeker, Professor, Yale University, West Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: nancy.redeker@yale.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: The purposes of this presentation are to describe the use of unattended polysomnography (PSG) in the home environment, methods used to assure data quality, and strengths and limitations of this methodology. Exemplars from our NINR-funded study of sleep in chronic heart failure will be used for illustration. Theoretical Framework: Sleep is a dynamic multidimensional biobehavioral circadian and homeostatic phenomenon. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): We obtained PSG on 125 adult patients with stable HF for one night each. Participants received a $50 honorarium for the PSG and other elements of the study. We used the Compumedics Safiro sleep recorder to record EEG (C3-A2/C4-A1), EOG (eye movements), and chin EMG to evaluate sleep architecture and arousals. Cardiorespiratory measures including ECG, nasal pressure (pressure transducer) and nasal airflow (thermistor), abdominal and respiratory effort, and pulse oximetry were obtained. Leg movements were measured with piezo-electric sensors. A trained sleep technician visited participants at home, applied the sensors, provided instruction, and programmed the sleep recorder. Participants slept at home without the sleep technician in attendance and removed the sensors upon awakening. A research assistant retrieved the equipment. Data were scored in the sleep laboratory using standardized criteria. Results: We were able to evaluate sleep architecture, sleep disordered breathing, and periodic limb movements. Adherence to the protocol was high, and data quality was excellent. Sensor loss, device malfunction, and study artifacts were minimal due to the use of state-of-the art equipment, careful training of the sleep technician, and coaching of study participants. Limitations include inability to directly observe participants' behavior and to replace sensors that become disconnected. Conclusions and Implications: Unattended polysomnography is a feasible method for measuring sleep among chronically ill adult patients in their homes. [Symposium presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUse of Unattended Polysomnography in Stable Heart Failure Patients Sleeping at Homeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRedeker, Nancy S.en_US
dc.author.detailsNancy Redeker, Professor, Yale University, West Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: nancy.redeker@yale.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163357-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purposes of this presentation are to describe the use of unattended polysomnography (PSG) in the home environment, methods used to assure data quality, and strengths and limitations of this methodology. Exemplars from our NINR-funded study of sleep in chronic heart failure will be used for illustration. Theoretical Framework: Sleep is a dynamic multidimensional biobehavioral circadian and homeostatic phenomenon. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): We obtained PSG on 125 adult patients with stable HF for one night each. Participants received a $50 honorarium for the PSG and other elements of the study. We used the Compumedics Safiro sleep recorder to record EEG (C3-A2/C4-A1), EOG (eye movements), and chin EMG to evaluate sleep architecture and arousals. Cardiorespiratory measures including ECG, nasal pressure (pressure transducer) and nasal airflow (thermistor), abdominal and respiratory effort, and pulse oximetry were obtained. Leg movements were measured with piezo-electric sensors. A trained sleep technician visited participants at home, applied the sensors, provided instruction, and programmed the sleep recorder. Participants slept at home without the sleep technician in attendance and removed the sensors upon awakening. A research assistant retrieved the equipment. Data were scored in the sleep laboratory using standardized criteria. Results: We were able to evaluate sleep architecture, sleep disordered breathing, and periodic limb movements. Adherence to the protocol was high, and data quality was excellent. Sensor loss, device malfunction, and study artifacts were minimal due to the use of state-of-the art equipment, careful training of the sleep technician, and coaching of study participants. Limitations include inability to directly observe participants' behavior and to replace sensors that become disconnected. Conclusions and Implications: Unattended polysomnography is a feasible method for measuring sleep among chronically ill adult patients in their homes. [Symposium presentation]en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:06:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:06:06Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.