2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163358
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Measurement of Sleep in Shift Workers Using Actigraphy and Sleep Diaries
Author(s):
Ruggiero, Jeanne; Redeker, Nancy S.; Fiedler, Nancy
Author Details:
Jeanne Ruggiero, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, Rutgers University College of Nursing, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: jruggier@andromeda.rutgers.edu; Nancy S. Redeker, PhD, RN; Nancy Fiedler, PhD
Abstract:
Purpose: A pilot study was undertaken to determine the feasibility of a protocol (in the subjects' home and work settings over a three day work period) to examine shift-related differences in sleep, performance, and depressed mood. Sleep was measured with wrist-worn actigraphs and sleep diaries. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the use of actigraphy and sleep diaries and methodological challenges that arose during data collection in a sample of shiftworkers. Theoretical Framework: Sleep timing and propensity are regulated by the interaction of homeostatic (length of time awake) and circadian (sleepiness cycle) processes. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): 18 staff nurses (12 day and 6 night shift) wore actigraphs for two or more continuous 24-hour periods and completed a sleep diary after each main sleep period. Participants received a $50 honorarium upon completion of the protocol. Mini-Motionlogger actigraphs (Ambulatory Monitoring, Inc., Ardsley, NY) and a shift work sleep diary were used to measure total wake and sleep time, number and duration of naps, sleep efficiency, sleep onset latency, and wake after sleep onset for each sleep period. Trained research assistants delivered the instruments to the participants' homes and provided verbal and written instructions. Participants returned the study materials in postage paid mailers. Actigraph data were downloaded into a personal computer using Act Millennium and analyzed with Action W software (Ambulatory Monitoring, Inc., Ardsley, NY). Results: Data analyses are in progress. Conclusions and Implications: Actigraphy and sleep diaries provide reliable measurements of sleep with minimal participant burden. Challenges included unexpected schedule changes and overtime that occurred as subjects participated in the study protocol. This resulted in some missing data and differences in shift start and end times. Future studies should be designed to oversample study participants to increase the number of complete data sets with relatively uniform shift start and end times or longer time intervals should be used. [Symposium presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeasurement of Sleep in Shift Workers Using Actigraphy and Sleep Diariesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRuggiero, Jeanneen_US
dc.contributor.authorRedeker, Nancy S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFiedler, Nancyen_US
dc.author.detailsJeanne Ruggiero, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, Rutgers University College of Nursing, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: jruggier@andromeda.rutgers.edu; Nancy S. Redeker, PhD, RN; Nancy Fiedler, PhDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163358-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: A pilot study was undertaken to determine the feasibility of a protocol (in the subjects' home and work settings over a three day work period) to examine shift-related differences in sleep, performance, and depressed mood. Sleep was measured with wrist-worn actigraphs and sleep diaries. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the use of actigraphy and sleep diaries and methodological challenges that arose during data collection in a sample of shiftworkers. Theoretical Framework: Sleep timing and propensity are regulated by the interaction of homeostatic (length of time awake) and circadian (sleepiness cycle) processes. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): 18 staff nurses (12 day and 6 night shift) wore actigraphs for two or more continuous 24-hour periods and completed a sleep diary after each main sleep period. Participants received a $50 honorarium upon completion of the protocol. Mini-Motionlogger actigraphs (Ambulatory Monitoring, Inc., Ardsley, NY) and a shift work sleep diary were used to measure total wake and sleep time, number and duration of naps, sleep efficiency, sleep onset latency, and wake after sleep onset for each sleep period. Trained research assistants delivered the instruments to the participants' homes and provided verbal and written instructions. Participants returned the study materials in postage paid mailers. Actigraph data were downloaded into a personal computer using Act Millennium and analyzed with Action W software (Ambulatory Monitoring, Inc., Ardsley, NY). Results: Data analyses are in progress. Conclusions and Implications: Actigraphy and sleep diaries provide reliable measurements of sleep with minimal participant burden. Challenges included unexpected schedule changes and overtime that occurred as subjects participated in the study protocol. This resulted in some missing data and differences in shift start and end times. Future studies should be designed to oversample study participants to increase the number of complete data sets with relatively uniform shift start and end times or longer time intervals should be used. [Symposium presentation]en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:06:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:06:07Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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