2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163362
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Theory to Application: Testing the N-CODES Program
Author(s):
Sosa, Mary-Elizabeth; O'Neill, Eileen S.
Author Details:
Mary-Elizabeth Sosa, Full Time Faculty, University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth, Dartmouth, Massachusetts, USA, email: either mesosa@umassd.edu; Eileen S. O'Neill
Abstract:
Purpose: For new technology to be implemented successfully, it must be thoroughly tested by the stakeholders who will use it. This paper reports on the two studies that have been completed to date testing N-CODES with practicing nurses. Theoretical Framework: The Clinical Decision making Model (CDMM) provided the theoretical foundation for the study. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): The first study examined the theoretical framework that guided the project. For a CDSS to support nurses effectively there must be the congruence between the way information is presented and the way clinicians cognitively process information. To trace nurses' reasoning processes a series of clinical problems were posed to nurses and their responses analyzed by thematic analysis. The second study tested the N-CODES working prototype. This protocol consisted of simulated tasks requiring the participants to use the system while solving patient problems. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected on usability, ease of navigation, and nurse satisfaction. Results: Findings from the first study support the processes outlined in the CDDM. From this data it is evident that clinical decision making is a dynamic, iterative, and interwoven process. This complexity makes nurses' work difficult to represent in CDSS programs. The findings did help the investigators design the flow of information in the program. The nurses ranked usability and ease of navigation highly in the investigation of the actual working prototype. Nurses were excited about the system's clinical potential and felt it would be useful to practitioners regardless of experience. Conclusions and Implications: These studies indicate that the conceptual base and the extensive knowledge system are strengths of the N-CODES system. The engineering accomplishments in structure and navigation issues have contributed to the success of the prototype. Testing the system in an actual clinical setting is the next step but it is clear that the system has extraordinary potential to assist nurses to improve clinical decision making and patient outcomes. [Symposium presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTheory to Application: Testing the N-CODES Programen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSosa, Mary-Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorO'Neill, Eileen S.en_US
dc.author.detailsMary-Elizabeth Sosa, Full Time Faculty, University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth, Dartmouth, Massachusetts, USA, email: either mesosa@umassd.edu; Eileen S. O'Neillen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163362-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: For new technology to be implemented successfully, it must be thoroughly tested by the stakeholders who will use it. This paper reports on the two studies that have been completed to date testing N-CODES with practicing nurses. Theoretical Framework: The Clinical Decision making Model (CDMM) provided the theoretical foundation for the study. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): The first study examined the theoretical framework that guided the project. For a CDSS to support nurses effectively there must be the congruence between the way information is presented and the way clinicians cognitively process information. To trace nurses' reasoning processes a series of clinical problems were posed to nurses and their responses analyzed by thematic analysis. The second study tested the N-CODES working prototype. This protocol consisted of simulated tasks requiring the participants to use the system while solving patient problems. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected on usability, ease of navigation, and nurse satisfaction. Results: Findings from the first study support the processes outlined in the CDDM. From this data it is evident that clinical decision making is a dynamic, iterative, and interwoven process. This complexity makes nurses' work difficult to represent in CDSS programs. The findings did help the investigators design the flow of information in the program. The nurses ranked usability and ease of navigation highly in the investigation of the actual working prototype. Nurses were excited about the system's clinical potential and felt it would be useful to practitioners regardless of experience. Conclusions and Implications: These studies indicate that the conceptual base and the extensive knowledge system are strengths of the N-CODES system. The engineering accomplishments in structure and navigation issues have contributed to the success of the prototype. Testing the system in an actual clinical setting is the next step but it is clear that the system has extraordinary potential to assist nurses to improve clinical decision making and patient outcomes. [Symposium presentation]en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:06:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:06:11Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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