Nurses Work, Working Nurses: The Conventions of Nurses' Work in the United States in the Early 20th Century

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163365
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses Work, Working Nurses: The Conventions of Nurses' Work in the United States in the Early 20th Century
Author(s):
Whelan, Jean
Author Details:
Jean Whelan, Adjunct Assistant Professor, University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: jcwhelan@nursing.upenn.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this historical analysis is to examine the ways in which early 20th Century private duty nurses secured work, identify the difficulties nurses encountered in creating a market niche and analyze strategies nurses used as they met challenges involved in establishing professional practice. Background: A critical first step in establishing the practice norms of professional nursing was formulating the conventions and patterns of work on a day-to-day basis. In the early 20th Century, nurses took on this task by creating an occupation that met the nursing needs of patients and at the same time provided employment. For the most part this activity took place in the private duty market. Methods (sources, analytic approach): This study used the principles of social history methodology in which the activities and experiences of ordinary working nurses are examined and analyzed to illuminate how nurses established initial nurse practices. Primary data was collected from records of private duty registries operating in large urban centers, organizational records of national, state and local professional associations, and contemporary documents and studies on the early 20th century nurse labor market. Secondary data examined to validate and corroborate findings include professional journals and newspapers. Results: Study results indicate that the private duty market was a tough competitive market in which professional nurses met opposition and confronted a number of outside groups interested in controlling their practice. Depending on time, place and context, nurses' experiences proved to be more or less successful in achieving the goals of professional practice. Conclusions and Implications: The private duty market was the first and for several decades the largest labor market for registered nurses. It was in the private duty market that nurses initially set many standards of work and employment. The efforts of early nurses to shape satisfactory practices affected the configuration of later 20th Century nursing practice in the United States. [Symposium presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses Work, Working Nurses: The Conventions of Nurses' Work in the United States in the Early 20th Centuryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWhelan, Jeanen_US
dc.author.detailsJean Whelan, Adjunct Assistant Professor, University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: jcwhelan@nursing.upenn.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163365-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this historical analysis is to examine the ways in which early 20th Century private duty nurses secured work, identify the difficulties nurses encountered in creating a market niche and analyze strategies nurses used as they met challenges involved in establishing professional practice. Background: A critical first step in establishing the practice norms of professional nursing was formulating the conventions and patterns of work on a day-to-day basis. In the early 20th Century, nurses took on this task by creating an occupation that met the nursing needs of patients and at the same time provided employment. For the most part this activity took place in the private duty market. Methods (sources, analytic approach): This study used the principles of social history methodology in which the activities and experiences of ordinary working nurses are examined and analyzed to illuminate how nurses established initial nurse practices. Primary data was collected from records of private duty registries operating in large urban centers, organizational records of national, state and local professional associations, and contemporary documents and studies on the early 20th century nurse labor market. Secondary data examined to validate and corroborate findings include professional journals and newspapers. Results: Study results indicate that the private duty market was a tough competitive market in which professional nurses met opposition and confronted a number of outside groups interested in controlling their practice. Depending on time, place and context, nurses' experiences proved to be more or less successful in achieving the goals of professional practice. Conclusions and Implications: The private duty market was the first and for several decades the largest labor market for registered nurses. It was in the private duty market that nurses initially set many standards of work and employment. The efforts of early nurses to shape satisfactory practices affected the configuration of later 20th Century nursing practice in the United States. [Symposium presentation]en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:06:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:06:14Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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