2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163366
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
APOE Genotype and Cognitive Outcomes After Severe TBI
Author(s):
Alexander, Sheila; Kim, Yookyung; Spiro, Richard M.; Beers, Sue R.
Author Details:
Sheila Alexander, Assistant Professor, University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: salexand@pitt.edu; Yookyung Kim, Ph.D.; Richard M. Spiro; Sue R. Beers
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine the association between APOE genotype and cognitive functioning after severe TBI. Theoretical Framework: Apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype has been associated with cognitive outcome in healthy individuals and individuals with Alzheimer disease. The APOE gene has three common alleles (e2, e3, e4) and the APOE e4 allele is associated with poorer cognition. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Individuals age 16-75 admitted with severe TBI [Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) < 8] enrolled in a larger NIH funded study and able to participate in the 6 month outcome examination were included in this study. Admission GCS was determined by the Neurosurgeon on call within 6 hours of injury. Demographic information (age, race, gender and education) was obtained during interview. APOE genotype was determined from cerebrospinal fluid utilizing standard genotyping techniques. The cohort was dichotomized based on APOE e4 allele presence and then based on APOE e2 allele presence for analysis. WAIS III digit span and Bushke selective reminding tests were administered 6 months after injury. Descriptive statistics, t-tests and ANOVA were used to assess associations between study variables. Results: The cohort of 84 subjects was primarily Caucasian (94.0%), and male (79.8%) with a mean age of 30.0 (SD+/-12.8). Twenty subjects had at least one copy of the APOE e4 allele while 15 had at least one copy of the APOE e2 allele. There were no significant differences in individuals with or without the APOE e4 allele. While individuals with the APOE e2 allele were older (Mean age 28.3 versus 38.3; p=.005), they had lower recognition memory subscores on the Bushke test (p=.02) and trends suggested lower scores on the WAIS III digit subtests (p< 08) after controlling for age. Conclusions and Implications: APOE genotype may be associated with cognitive outcome after severe TBI. Specifically, the APOE e2 allele was associated with poorer attention and verbal recognition memory.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAPOE Genotype and Cognitive Outcomes After Severe TBIen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAlexander, Sheilaen_US
dc.contributor.authorKim, Yookyungen_US
dc.contributor.authorSpiro, Richard M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBeers, Sue R.en_US
dc.author.detailsSheila Alexander, Assistant Professor, University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: salexand@pitt.edu; Yookyung Kim, Ph.D.; Richard M. Spiro; Sue R. Beersen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163366-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study is to determine the association between APOE genotype and cognitive functioning after severe TBI. Theoretical Framework: Apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype has been associated with cognitive outcome in healthy individuals and individuals with Alzheimer disease. The APOE gene has three common alleles (e2, e3, e4) and the APOE e4 allele is associated with poorer cognition. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Individuals age 16-75 admitted with severe TBI [Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) < 8] enrolled in a larger NIH funded study and able to participate in the 6 month outcome examination were included in this study. Admission GCS was determined by the Neurosurgeon on call within 6 hours of injury. Demographic information (age, race, gender and education) was obtained during interview. APOE genotype was determined from cerebrospinal fluid utilizing standard genotyping techniques. The cohort was dichotomized based on APOE e4 allele presence and then based on APOE e2 allele presence for analysis. WAIS III digit span and Bushke selective reminding tests were administered 6 months after injury. Descriptive statistics, t-tests and ANOVA were used to assess associations between study variables. Results: The cohort of 84 subjects was primarily Caucasian (94.0%), and male (79.8%) with a mean age of 30.0 (SD+/-12.8). Twenty subjects had at least one copy of the APOE e4 allele while 15 had at least one copy of the APOE e2 allele. There were no significant differences in individuals with or without the APOE e4 allele. While individuals with the APOE e2 allele were older (Mean age 28.3 versus 38.3; p=.005), they had lower recognition memory subscores on the Bushke test (p=.02) and trends suggested lower scores on the WAIS III digit subtests (p< 08) after controlling for age. Conclusions and Implications: APOE genotype may be associated with cognitive outcome after severe TBI. Specifically, the APOE e2 allele was associated with poorer attention and verbal recognition memory.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:06:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:06:16Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.