Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy: Interpreting Discrepancies Between Symptom Severity and Patient Appraisal of Effects on Quality of Life

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163370
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy: Interpreting Discrepancies Between Symptom Severity and Patient Appraisal of Effects on Quality of Life
Author(s):
Bakitas, Marie A.
Author Details:
Marie A. Bakitas, ARNP, DNSc(c), Adult Nurse Pratitioner, Palliative Care, Dartmouth University Section of Palliative Medicine, Lebanon, New Hampshire, USA, email: marie.bakitas@dartmouth.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy is a common, but poorly understood side effect with few options for prevention or management. Information is needed to determine the extent of the problem and clinical management. Background: In chemotherapy trials, CIPN incidence ranges from 10-100% depending on the drug(s), dose(s), patient factors, and measurement system; however its specific nature, symptom experience, and impact on function or QOL has received little attention. Empirical reports identify a wide spectrum of impact from "minimal" to "devastating"; however data is lacking to explicate specific symptoms and their impact their everyday life. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): An exploratory, descriptive mixed methods (qualitative description and self-report questionnaires) study explored CIPN symptoms and their effect on everyday life. A literature review and 2 pilot interviews informed the development of interview questions. Constant comparative analysis of field notes and 27 verbatim transcribed interviews was conducted using Atlas-TI software. A progressive process of classifying, comparing, grouping, and refining reduced data into patterns and themes to achieve a sense of the whole and areas of convergence and divergence of experiences. Results: Five thematic areas emerged from the original 50 codes: Symptom descriptions; Functional Effects; Appraisal of Effect on Everyday Life; Clinician awareness/response and Treatment Decision-Making. This presentation focuses on relationships among 3 patient-related themes. Although significant symptom severity and disrupted physiological function was reported most "learned to live with it" and minimized its effect on everyday life. CIPN was considered "the price to pay" to "get rid of the cancer"; although a minority thought it too high a price and negotiated reduction, change or discontinuation of the neurotoxic chemotherapy. Conclusions and Implications: CIPN measurement currently involves objective testing, clinician grading, and self-report symptom checklists; measures that lack specificity about patient-based priorities. This study contributes an understanding of specific disability and proposes mediators between symptom severity and QOL effects.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy: Interpreting Discrepancies Between Symptom Severity and Patient Appraisal of Effects on Quality of Lifeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBakitas, Marie A.en_US
dc.author.detailsMarie A. Bakitas, ARNP, DNSc(c), Adult Nurse Pratitioner, Palliative Care, Dartmouth University Section of Palliative Medicine, Lebanon, New Hampshire, USA, email: marie.bakitas@dartmouth.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163370-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy is a common, but poorly understood side effect with few options for prevention or management. Information is needed to determine the extent of the problem and clinical management. Background: In chemotherapy trials, CIPN incidence ranges from 10-100% depending on the drug(s), dose(s), patient factors, and measurement system; however its specific nature, symptom experience, and impact on function or QOL has received little attention. Empirical reports identify a wide spectrum of impact from "minimal" to "devastating"; however data is lacking to explicate specific symptoms and their impact their everyday life. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): An exploratory, descriptive mixed methods (qualitative description and self-report questionnaires) study explored CIPN symptoms and their effect on everyday life. A literature review and 2 pilot interviews informed the development of interview questions. Constant comparative analysis of field notes and 27 verbatim transcribed interviews was conducted using Atlas-TI software. A progressive process of classifying, comparing, grouping, and refining reduced data into patterns and themes to achieve a sense of the whole and areas of convergence and divergence of experiences. Results: Five thematic areas emerged from the original 50 codes: Symptom descriptions; Functional Effects; Appraisal of Effect on Everyday Life; Clinician awareness/response and Treatment Decision-Making. This presentation focuses on relationships among 3 patient-related themes. Although significant symptom severity and disrupted physiological function was reported most "learned to live with it" and minimized its effect on everyday life. CIPN was considered "the price to pay" to "get rid of the cancer"; although a minority thought it too high a price and negotiated reduction, change or discontinuation of the neurotoxic chemotherapy. Conclusions and Implications: CIPN measurement currently involves objective testing, clinician grading, and self-report symptom checklists; measures that lack specificity about patient-based priorities. This study contributes an understanding of specific disability and proposes mediators between symptom severity and QOL effects.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:06:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:06:20Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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