Family Perceptions of End-of-Life Care in an NCI-Designated Comprehensive Cancer Center

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163371
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Family Perceptions of End-of-Life Care in an NCI-Designated Comprehensive Cancer Center
Author(s):
Bakitas, Marie A.; Ahles, Tim A.; Brokaw, Frances; Byock, Ira
Author Details:
Marie A. Bakitas, ARNP, DNSc(c), Adult Nurse Practitioner, Palliative Care, Dartmouth University Section of Palliative Medicine, Lebanon, New Hampshire, USA, email: marie.bakitas@dartmouth.edu; Tim A. Ahles, PhD; Frances Brokaw, MD, MS; Ira Byock, MD
Abstract:
Purpose: Evaluating end-of-life care can be difficult because of declining energy and cognition as death approaches. Families' perceptions are considered a valid way to capture and evaluate the end of life (EOL) experience. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Project ENABLE (Educate, Nurture, Advise, Before Life Ends) was a demonstration project to integrate palliative care concepts across the care continuum for persons with advanced cancer (Bakitas et. al. 2004). The Afterdeath Interview (ADI), a 64 item survey to evaluate decedent's quality of life and quality of care was conducted by phone with a family member involved in the participants' care approximately 3-6 months following the participant's death. The ADI was completed by 30% (N=88) of the family members of the 242 project decedents. Inability to identify or locate an involved family member and refusals comprised the major reasons for non-participation. Theoretical Framework: Teno's Patient-Focused, Family-Centered Medical Care Conceptual Model. Results: The decedents were predominantly white, married, with some college education, and equally distributed between catholic and protestant religions. Family reported that 77% had a durable power of attorney for health care and 81% had a living will. Just over 60% had discussed these with their doctor. However a third responded that this had no effect on the care. Eighty four percent reported that they believed their loved one's wishes were followed. Sixty-eight percent believed their loved one died in desired location. Nearly half died at home with hospice; (mean LOS 1.5 days); 31% died in hospital (non-ICU), 7% in ICU; and 9% in nursing home. Conclusions and Implications: Proxy reports of rates of advance care planning were higher in ENABLE than those reported in previous studies; however communication of these preferences to clinicians and earlier hospice referral continue as areas for improvement.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFamily Perceptions of End-of-Life Care in an NCI-Designated Comprehensive Cancer Centeren_GB
dc.contributor.authorBakitas, Marie A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAhles, Tim A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrokaw, Francesen_US
dc.contributor.authorByock, Iraen_US
dc.author.detailsMarie A. Bakitas, ARNP, DNSc(c), Adult Nurse Practitioner, Palliative Care, Dartmouth University Section of Palliative Medicine, Lebanon, New Hampshire, USA, email: marie.bakitas@dartmouth.edu; Tim A. Ahles, PhD; Frances Brokaw, MD, MS; Ira Byock, MDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163371-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Evaluating end-of-life care can be difficult because of declining energy and cognition as death approaches. Families' perceptions are considered a valid way to capture and evaluate the end of life (EOL) experience. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Project ENABLE (Educate, Nurture, Advise, Before Life Ends) was a demonstration project to integrate palliative care concepts across the care continuum for persons with advanced cancer (Bakitas et. al. 2004). The Afterdeath Interview (ADI), a 64 item survey to evaluate decedent's quality of life and quality of care was conducted by phone with a family member involved in the participants' care approximately 3-6 months following the participant's death. The ADI was completed by 30% (N=88) of the family members of the 242 project decedents. Inability to identify or locate an involved family member and refusals comprised the major reasons for non-participation. Theoretical Framework: Teno's Patient-Focused, Family-Centered Medical Care Conceptual Model. Results: The decedents were predominantly white, married, with some college education, and equally distributed between catholic and protestant religions. Family reported that 77% had a durable power of attorney for health care and 81% had a living will. Just over 60% had discussed these with their doctor. However a third responded that this had no effect on the care. Eighty four percent reported that they believed their loved one's wishes were followed. Sixty-eight percent believed their loved one died in desired location. Nearly half died at home with hospice; (mean LOS 1.5 days); 31% died in hospital (non-ICU), 7% in ICU; and 9% in nursing home. Conclusions and Implications: Proxy reports of rates of advance care planning were higher in ENABLE than those reported in previous studies; however communication of these preferences to clinicians and earlier hospice referral continue as areas for improvement.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:06:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:06:21Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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