2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163372
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perinatal Group-Specific Effects on Academic Success at Age 12
Author(s):
Barcelos, Suzy; Sullivan, Mary C.; Marks, Amy K.
Author Details:
Suzy Barcelos, MA, Project Director, University of Rhode Island Pediatrics, Providence, Rhode Island, USA, email: sbarcels@etal.uri.edu; Mary C. Sullivan, Ph.D.; Amy K. Marks, Sc. M.
Abstract:
Purpose: Preterm early adolescents lag behind peers in academic performance, have more remedial services, and grade retention, thus suggesting latency until challenged in middle school. We don't know why some preterm adolescents do better academically and how perinatal morbidity affects school outcomes. Our purpose was to examine academic success at age 12 in a sample of children born at various degrees of perinatal morbidity. Theoretical Framework: The transactional model incorporates biological and environmental influences on child development. Academic success reflects an interplay between the developing preterm child and the dynamic environment. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A prospective, longitudinal design of 191 preterm infants of five groups was sampled at age 12: full-term (n=45), healthy preterm (n=30), medical preterm (n=52), neurological preterm (n=34), and small for gestational age (n=30). School data from over 60 schools were gathered on core curriculum subjects, attendance records, grade retention, tardiness, suspensions/detentions, interpersonal effort, work effort, and specialized services and/or academic resources. Teachers reported on academic productivity, behavior problems, and social competence. Results: Between-group differences on school success were similar at age 12. A within-group analysis identified group-specific associations. Regression models were built from bivariate associations, explaining 42-67% variance in grades. With SES co-varied, the predictor variables differed for each group, with interpersonal and work effort, ADHD, attendance, tardiness, and home environment predicting better grades for the preterm groups. Age 8 IQ, presence of cumulative risk, and school attendance predicted grades for adolescents born full-term. Conclusions and Implications: Schoolwork presents a developmental challenge in middle school, especially for preterm adolescents. Preterm infants are not a homogenous group. Rather, social, behavioral, and academic variables explain perinatal group-specific academic success. These results illustrate how perinatal morbidity is a context for variations in academic success in early adolescents and inform professionals and parents of intervention possibilities.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerinatal Group-Specific Effects on Academic Success at Age 12en_GB
dc.contributor.authorBarcelos, Suzyen_US
dc.contributor.authorSullivan, Mary C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMarks, Amy K.en_US
dc.author.detailsSuzy Barcelos, MA, Project Director, University of Rhode Island Pediatrics, Providence, Rhode Island, USA, email: sbarcels@etal.uri.edu; Mary C. Sullivan, Ph.D.; Amy K. Marks, Sc. M.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163372-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Preterm early adolescents lag behind peers in academic performance, have more remedial services, and grade retention, thus suggesting latency until challenged in middle school. We don't know why some preterm adolescents do better academically and how perinatal morbidity affects school outcomes. Our purpose was to examine academic success at age 12 in a sample of children born at various degrees of perinatal morbidity. Theoretical Framework: The transactional model incorporates biological and environmental influences on child development. Academic success reflects an interplay between the developing preterm child and the dynamic environment. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A prospective, longitudinal design of 191 preterm infants of five groups was sampled at age 12: full-term (n=45), healthy preterm (n=30), medical preterm (n=52), neurological preterm (n=34), and small for gestational age (n=30). School data from over 60 schools were gathered on core curriculum subjects, attendance records, grade retention, tardiness, suspensions/detentions, interpersonal effort, work effort, and specialized services and/or academic resources. Teachers reported on academic productivity, behavior problems, and social competence. Results: Between-group differences on school success were similar at age 12. A within-group analysis identified group-specific associations. Regression models were built from bivariate associations, explaining 42-67% variance in grades. With SES co-varied, the predictor variables differed for each group, with interpersonal and work effort, ADHD, attendance, tardiness, and home environment predicting better grades for the preterm groups. Age 8 IQ, presence of cumulative risk, and school attendance predicted grades for adolescents born full-term. Conclusions and Implications: Schoolwork presents a developmental challenge in middle school, especially for preterm adolescents. Preterm infants are not a homogenous group. Rather, social, behavioral, and academic variables explain perinatal group-specific academic success. These results illustrate how perinatal morbidity is a context for variations in academic success in early adolescents and inform professionals and parents of intervention possibilities.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:06:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:06:22Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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