Braving a new world: Barriers and facilitators to primary health care for ex-offender women and their children

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163375
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Braving a new world: Barriers and facilitators to primary health care for ex-offender women and their children
Author(s):
Bitzer, Carolynn A.; Byrne, Mary W.
Author Details:
Carolynn A. Bitzer, MSN, RN, CS, FNP, Graduate Research Assistant, Columbia University School of Nursing, New York, New York, USA, email: cab2119@columbia.edu; Mary W. Byrne, PhD, MPH, FAAN
Abstract:
Purpose: This study identifies barriers and facilitators for recently incarcerated women and their children accessing primary health care services early in their post-release period. Theoretical Framework: Transition theory is an emerging framework which suits exploration of this target population whose members are moving from the crisis of the mother's incarceration back into society where they must re-establish identity, resources, and goals. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): In the context of a larger longitudinal study, "Maternal and Child Outcomes of a Prison Nursery Program" (RO1 NR 00782, M. Byrne PI), this preliminary report describes the health-related transition needs for 35 of the first 44 caregiver/infant dyads to be released. Comprehensive structured telephone interviews were completed within 2 to 4 months post release. Content analysis of telephone data were referenced with demographics, weekly field notes, and home visit observations. Results: Barriers to primary care access included: frequent changes of residence, urgency for day care and employment, and mother's pre-existing health conditions (e.g. HIV, bipolar, depression, eating disorder, addictions). ER visits and hospital admissions were commonly utilized for children's recurrent medical problems. Facilitators to primary access included: family support, knowledge of resources, steady work, and residing in structured housing programs. Primary insurance source reported was Medicaid (80%) followed by private insurance (15%). 95% of the mothers were able to cite a primary care provider for their child but only 77% of the mothers were able to state their own regular primary care source. Conclusions and Implications: Mothers routinely prioritized children's needs but failed to achieve continuity of care. These ex-offenders lack systems to bridge community health services at time of release. Trans-disciplinary efforts among criminal justice, social services, and health providers are urgently needed to facilitate successful transition.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBraving a new world: Barriers and facilitators to primary health care for ex-offender women and their childrenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBitzer, Carolynn A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorByrne, Mary W.en_US
dc.author.detailsCarolynn A. Bitzer, MSN, RN, CS, FNP, Graduate Research Assistant, Columbia University School of Nursing, New York, New York, USA, email: cab2119@columbia.edu; Mary W. Byrne, PhD, MPH, FAANen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163375-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This study identifies barriers and facilitators for recently incarcerated women and their children accessing primary health care services early in their post-release period. Theoretical Framework: Transition theory is an emerging framework which suits exploration of this target population whose members are moving from the crisis of the mother's incarceration back into society where they must re-establish identity, resources, and goals. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): In the context of a larger longitudinal study, "Maternal and Child Outcomes of a Prison Nursery Program" (RO1 NR 00782, M. Byrne PI), this preliminary report describes the health-related transition needs for 35 of the first 44 caregiver/infant dyads to be released. Comprehensive structured telephone interviews were completed within 2 to 4 months post release. Content analysis of telephone data were referenced with demographics, weekly field notes, and home visit observations. Results: Barriers to primary care access included: frequent changes of residence, urgency for day care and employment, and mother's pre-existing health conditions (e.g. HIV, bipolar, depression, eating disorder, addictions). ER visits and hospital admissions were commonly utilized for children's recurrent medical problems. Facilitators to primary access included: family support, knowledge of resources, steady work, and residing in structured housing programs. Primary insurance source reported was Medicaid (80%) followed by private insurance (15%). 95% of the mothers were able to cite a primary care provider for their child but only 77% of the mothers were able to state their own regular primary care source. Conclusions and Implications: Mothers routinely prioritized children's needs but failed to achieve continuity of care. These ex-offenders lack systems to bridge community health services at time of release. Trans-disciplinary efforts among criminal justice, social services, and health providers are urgently needed to facilitate successful transition.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:06:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:06:26Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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