2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163377
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Negative Outcomes of the Witness Experience for Children
Author(s):
Boyd, Cory Ann
Author Details:
Cory Ann Boyd, RN, MSN, EdD, Clinical Assistant Professor, Rutgers University College of Nursing, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: coryboyd@rutgers.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: To describe the experiences of children who are innocent witnesses of a crime; to describe existing support systems and problem areas; and to demonstrate the current lack of resources and support available to address the potentially negative outcomes child witnesses may experience. Background: Children's courtroom experiences can be more stressful and horrifying than the experience that brought them to court. Although research studies suggest the occurrence of negative effects of confrontation upon a child witness, few examine the cognitive and social outcomes experienced by these children prior to, during and following their interaction with the legal system and their testimony in a court of law. Approach: A case study will be used to describe the negative outcomes of the witness experience for one child. Major Points & Rationale: As more children fall victim to or observe acts of violence, more children will be called upon to serve as witnesses in courts of law. Nurses from multiple specialty areas are perfectly positioned to advocate and provide care and support to the child and family that must interact with a legal system that is not built for children. Without a good understanding of what happens to the child and family, nurses are at a loss to provide much needed support. Conclusions: The rising rate of violent crime that involves children may result in an increased number of children who become innocent witnesses of a crime. Children who witness crime are at risk for mental and psychosocial health disorders. This study of the experiences of a child witness may guide forensic nurses, psychiatric nurses, pediatric nurses, and pediatric nurse practitioners in identifying the need for and providing meaningful support to the child and family.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNegative Outcomes of the Witness Experience for Childrenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBoyd, Cory Annen_US
dc.author.detailsCory Ann Boyd, RN, MSN, EdD, Clinical Assistant Professor, Rutgers University College of Nursing, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: coryboyd@rutgers.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163377-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To describe the experiences of children who are innocent witnesses of a crime; to describe existing support systems and problem areas; and to demonstrate the current lack of resources and support available to address the potentially negative outcomes child witnesses may experience. Background: Children's courtroom experiences can be more stressful and horrifying than the experience that brought them to court. Although research studies suggest the occurrence of negative effects of confrontation upon a child witness, few examine the cognitive and social outcomes experienced by these children prior to, during and following their interaction with the legal system and their testimony in a court of law. Approach: A case study will be used to describe the negative outcomes of the witness experience for one child. Major Points & Rationale: As more children fall victim to or observe acts of violence, more children will be called upon to serve as witnesses in courts of law. Nurses from multiple specialty areas are perfectly positioned to advocate and provide care and support to the child and family that must interact with a legal system that is not built for children. Without a good understanding of what happens to the child and family, nurses are at a loss to provide much needed support. Conclusions: The rising rate of violent crime that involves children may result in an increased number of children who become innocent witnesses of a crime. Children who witness crime are at risk for mental and psychosocial health disorders. This study of the experiences of a child witness may guide forensic nurses, psychiatric nurses, pediatric nurses, and pediatric nurse practitioners in identifying the need for and providing meaningful support to the child and family.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:06:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:06:28Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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