Demographic, Labor Market, Attitudinal, and Work Setting Factors that Influence Workforce Turnover of RNs Over One Year's Time

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163378
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Demographic, Labor Market, Attitudinal, and Work Setting Factors that Influence Workforce Turnover of RNs Over One Year's Time
Author(s):
Brewer, Carol S.; Kovner, Christine K.; Greene, William; Yow-Wu, Wu; Cheng, Ying
Author Details:
Carol S. Brewer, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Buffalo School of Nursing, Buffalo, New York, USA, email: csbrewer@buffalo.edu; Christine K. Kovner, PhD; William Greene, PhD; Wu Yow-Wu, PhD; Ying Cheng, MA
Abstract:
Purpose: To combine two theoretical perspectives with a panel design and new statistical methods to examine RN workforce behavior over time. Theoretical Framework: We apply an integrated model of RN turnover and economic theory to actual work behavior one year later. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Design and Sample: The panel survey design had a randomly selected sample of RNs from 40 MSAs in 29 states. We mailed the survey one year apart (N= 1348 RNs). Measures: The questionnaire included demographic questions, 12 work attitude measures and work variables. We merged Metropolitan Statistical Area from Interstudy and BLS. Analysis: The data was analyzed using bivariate probit regression. We examined whether the work or not work behavior is related to the full-time or part-time work behavior, and which time 1 factors influence each work behavior at time 2. Results: The NW/Work and PT/FT relationship is not significant. Older RNs and RNs with a Baccalaureate were less likely to work. Foreign graduate RNs or RN intention to work positively predicted work. In the FTPT regression, RNs were more likely to work full-time (FT) if they were: male, managers or an APN, RNs who resided in an MSA with higher inpatient per day ratios, or had a higher quantitative workload and work motivation. RNs were more likely to work part-time (PT) if they were: minority; as the age or other income of RNs or the RN ratio to population rose, did not have medical insurance or paid time off, or thought benefits were less important. Conclusions and Implications: Results were not consistent with typical turnover studies. Different factors influence working or not versus deciding to work FT or not. This is the first study to demonstrate an effect of MSA level variables on RN work behavior, as well as show that economic and demographic factors as well as RN attitudes influence work behavior over time.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDemographic, Labor Market, Attitudinal, and Work Setting Factors that Influence Workforce Turnover of RNs Over One Year's Timeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrewer, Carol S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKovner, Christine K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGreene, Williamen_US
dc.contributor.authorYow-Wu, Wuen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheng, Yingen_US
dc.author.detailsCarol S. Brewer, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Buffalo School of Nursing, Buffalo, New York, USA, email: csbrewer@buffalo.edu; Christine K. Kovner, PhD; William Greene, PhD; Wu Yow-Wu, PhD; Ying Cheng, MAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163378-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To combine two theoretical perspectives with a panel design and new statistical methods to examine RN workforce behavior over time. Theoretical Framework: We apply an integrated model of RN turnover and economic theory to actual work behavior one year later. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Design and Sample: The panel survey design had a randomly selected sample of RNs from 40 MSAs in 29 states. We mailed the survey one year apart (N= 1348 RNs). Measures: The questionnaire included demographic questions, 12 work attitude measures and work variables. We merged Metropolitan Statistical Area from Interstudy and BLS. Analysis: The data was analyzed using bivariate probit regression. We examined whether the work or not work behavior is related to the full-time or part-time work behavior, and which time 1 factors influence each work behavior at time 2. Results: The NW/Work and PT/FT relationship is not significant. Older RNs and RNs with a Baccalaureate were less likely to work. Foreign graduate RNs or RN intention to work positively predicted work. In the FTPT regression, RNs were more likely to work full-time (FT) if they were: male, managers or an APN, RNs who resided in an MSA with higher inpatient per day ratios, or had a higher quantitative workload and work motivation. RNs were more likely to work part-time (PT) if they were: minority; as the age or other income of RNs or the RN ratio to population rose, did not have medical insurance or paid time off, or thought benefits were less important. Conclusions and Implications: Results were not consistent with typical turnover studies. Different factors influence working or not versus deciding to work FT or not. This is the first study to demonstrate an effect of MSA level variables on RN work behavior, as well as show that economic and demographic factors as well as RN attitudes influence work behavior over time.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:06:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:06:30Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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