A Case Study of the Medical History of Alfonse "Scarface" Capone: Relevance to Current Research and Practice

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163379
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Case Study of the Medical History of Alfonse "Scarface" Capone: Relevance to Current Research and Practice
Author(s):
Brewer-Smyth, Kathleen
Author Details:
Kathleen Brewer-Smyth, PhD RN CRRN, Assistant Professor, University of Delaware School of Nursing, Newark, Delaware, USA, email: kbsmyth@udel.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: The medical history of Alfonse "Scarface" Capone was investigated to search for relationships to current research data describing neurological abnormalities of prison inmates. Background: Neurological impairment, traumatic brain injuries, childhood trauma, and childhood abuse have been associated with violent and high risk behaviors of prison inmates. Methods (sources, analytic approach): Medical, prison, criminal, and media records from the National Archives describing the life of Gangster, Al "Scarface" Capone were investigated. Results: Historical records of the life, crimes, and medical conditions of Al Capone suggest similarities to current prison research data collected by this principal investigator under the guidance of multidisciplinary teams. Our research data suggests relationships between neurological abnormalities and high risk behaviors of female prison inmates. Records also suggest an association between Al Capone's declining neurological condition and increased high risk behaviors. He was nicknamed "Scarface" due to facial scars that dated back to his youth. He stopped going to school for multiple reasons. Medical records describe an infectious process at the time of Al Capone's transfer to Alcatraz, which lead to progressive neurological decline until his death at age 48. Conclusions and Implications: Treatment is now available for the infectious process that contributed to Al Capone's early death. However, other infectious processes potentially involving the central nervous system, including HIV and hepatitis are known to be prevalent in prison populations today. Facial scars secondary to abuse and traumatic brain injuries are also prevalent in prison populations. Exposures to trauma during childhood and neurological abnormalities may continue to be associated with violent and other high risk behaviors in adulthood. Health care providers could play a critical role in identifying youths at risk in order to decrease high risk behaviors associated not only with crime, but also with transmission of infectious diseases.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Case Study of the Medical History of Alfonse "Scarface" Capone: Relevance to Current Research and Practiceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrewer-Smyth, Kathleenen_US
dc.author.detailsKathleen Brewer-Smyth, PhD RN CRRN, Assistant Professor, University of Delaware School of Nursing, Newark, Delaware, USA, email: kbsmyth@udel.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163379-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The medical history of Alfonse "Scarface" Capone was investigated to search for relationships to current research data describing neurological abnormalities of prison inmates. Background: Neurological impairment, traumatic brain injuries, childhood trauma, and childhood abuse have been associated with violent and high risk behaviors of prison inmates. Methods (sources, analytic approach): Medical, prison, criminal, and media records from the National Archives describing the life of Gangster, Al "Scarface" Capone were investigated. Results: Historical records of the life, crimes, and medical conditions of Al Capone suggest similarities to current prison research data collected by this principal investigator under the guidance of multidisciplinary teams. Our research data suggests relationships between neurological abnormalities and high risk behaviors of female prison inmates. Records also suggest an association between Al Capone's declining neurological condition and increased high risk behaviors. He was nicknamed "Scarface" due to facial scars that dated back to his youth. He stopped going to school for multiple reasons. Medical records describe an infectious process at the time of Al Capone's transfer to Alcatraz, which lead to progressive neurological decline until his death at age 48. Conclusions and Implications: Treatment is now available for the infectious process that contributed to Al Capone's early death. However, other infectious processes potentially involving the central nervous system, including HIV and hepatitis are known to be prevalent in prison populations today. Facial scars secondary to abuse and traumatic brain injuries are also prevalent in prison populations. Exposures to trauma during childhood and neurological abnormalities may continue to be associated with violent and other high risk behaviors in adulthood. Health care providers could play a critical role in identifying youths at risk in order to decrease high risk behaviors associated not only with crime, but also with transmission of infectious diseases.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:06:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:06:31Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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