Contribution of Multidimensional Contextual Factors during Adolescence and Young Adulthood to Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Birth Outcomes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163380
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Contribution of Multidimensional Contextual Factors during Adolescence and Young Adulthood to Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Birth Outcomes
Author(s):
Brewin, Dorothy
Author Details:
Dorothy Brewin, CNM, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts, USA, email: dorothy_brewin@uml.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: To inform strategies for reducing racial and ethnic disparities in birth outcomes, this study examined the relationship between multidimensional contextual social, environmental and economic factors during adolescence and subsequent risk of low birth weight during adolescence and young adulthood. Theoretical Framework: A model developed from life course theory (Halfon & Hochstein, 2002) and James's (1993) biopsychosocial framework for evaluation of racial disparities in birth outcomes was utilized. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Data for analyses was derived from the Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (ADD Health: Waves I, II, III). The final sample was 1228 adolescents, 35% black non-Hispanic (BNH) and 65% white non-Hispanic (WNH) who gave birth after Wave I and reported births in Wave III. Independent variables were from the domains of personal characteristics, health, access to care and social environment. The dependent variable of interest was low birth weight (LBW). An overall and two race specific logistic regression models were estimated. Results: Overall BNH women had 2.2 times the risk of LBW compared to WNH women. Past health problems, sexually transmitted disease, exposure to violence, and perceived lack of social support during adolescence increase their risk of LBW infants for BNH women. Intimate partner support during pregnancy and limited use of substances during adolescence were protective for BNH women. Smoking, maternal LBW, being underweight during adolescence and intimate partner violence increased the risk of LBW for WNH women. Conclusions and Implications: Findings suggest that prevention of LBW must be part of a longitudinal and contextually integrated strategy to promote optimal development of women's reproductive health not only during pregnancy, but also over one's life course. Factors that contribute to LBW are different for BNH women as compared to WNH women.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleContribution of Multidimensional Contextual Factors during Adolescence and Young Adulthood to Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Birth Outcomesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrewin, Dorothyen_US
dc.author.detailsDorothy Brewin, CNM, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts, USA, email: dorothy_brewin@uml.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163380-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To inform strategies for reducing racial and ethnic disparities in birth outcomes, this study examined the relationship between multidimensional contextual social, environmental and economic factors during adolescence and subsequent risk of low birth weight during adolescence and young adulthood. Theoretical Framework: A model developed from life course theory (Halfon & Hochstein, 2002) and James's (1993) biopsychosocial framework for evaluation of racial disparities in birth outcomes was utilized. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Data for analyses was derived from the Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (ADD Health: Waves I, II, III). The final sample was 1228 adolescents, 35% black non-Hispanic (BNH) and 65% white non-Hispanic (WNH) who gave birth after Wave I and reported births in Wave III. Independent variables were from the domains of personal characteristics, health, access to care and social environment. The dependent variable of interest was low birth weight (LBW). An overall and two race specific logistic regression models were estimated. Results: Overall BNH women had 2.2 times the risk of LBW compared to WNH women. Past health problems, sexually transmitted disease, exposure to violence, and perceived lack of social support during adolescence increase their risk of LBW infants for BNH women. Intimate partner support during pregnancy and limited use of substances during adolescence were protective for BNH women. Smoking, maternal LBW, being underweight during adolescence and intimate partner violence increased the risk of LBW for WNH women. Conclusions and Implications: Findings suggest that prevention of LBW must be part of a longitudinal and contextually integrated strategy to promote optimal development of women's reproductive health not only during pregnancy, but also over one's life course. Factors that contribute to LBW are different for BNH women as compared to WNH women.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:06:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:06:32Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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