2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163384
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Physical Activity in School Age Children at Risk for Childhood Overweight
Author(s):
Calamaro, Christina J.
Author Details:
Christina J. Calamaro, PhD, CRNP, Post Doctoral Fellow, University of Pennsylvania Center for Sleep and Respiratory Neurobiology/ Schools of Medicine and Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: calamaro@nursing.upenn.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Childhood overweight has increased markedly in recent years, yet impact of children's physical activity on excess adiposity is not clear. This study examined: 1) impact of physical activity intensity and overweight risk at age 7 on BMI at age 8, 2) impact of physical activity and overweight risk on fat mass (FM) and fat free mass (FFM), 3) correlations between measured physical activity and reported physical inactivity on Child Activity Questionnaire. Theoretical Framework: Assessment of environmental influences on development of body weight in cohort of children born at high-risk or low-risk for obesity; separated based on maternal BMI, a known risk factor for development of overweight in children. Through environmental and heritability interaction, a clear picture of influence of genes on weight gain can be described. Study will focus on prepubertal age of 6 to 8 years; this age period may be critical period for increased development of overweight. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Cross-sectional study of 55 Caucasian children, 25 at high risk and 30 at low risk of overweight. Physical activity intensity over 7 days collected by TriTrac R3D accelerometry. Parents reported child's typical physical inactivity at age 7 by the Child Activity Questionnaire. BMI calculated from measured height and weight at ages 6, 7, 8 years. FM and FFM measured by dual x-ray absorptiometry at 6 and 8 years, and normalized to height. Results: Vigorous and hard physical activity were predictive of BMI at age 8 in children at high risk for obesity. Risk and physical activity interaction is suggested for children at low risk. Physical activity was not predictive of normalized FM and FFM at age 8. Physical inactivity was negatively associated with measured physical activity in low risk children. Conclusions and Implications: Risk of overweight plays important role in the development of overweight in children, while physical activity offers more protection against overweight in low risk than high risk children.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePhysical Activity in School Age Children at Risk for Childhood Overweighten_GB
dc.contributor.authorCalamaro, Christina J.en_US
dc.author.detailsChristina J. Calamaro, PhD, CRNP, Post Doctoral Fellow, University of Pennsylvania Center for Sleep and Respiratory Neurobiology/ Schools of Medicine and Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: calamaro@nursing.upenn.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163384-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Childhood overweight has increased markedly in recent years, yet impact of children's physical activity on excess adiposity is not clear. This study examined: 1) impact of physical activity intensity and overweight risk at age 7 on BMI at age 8, 2) impact of physical activity and overweight risk on fat mass (FM) and fat free mass (FFM), 3) correlations between measured physical activity and reported physical inactivity on Child Activity Questionnaire. Theoretical Framework: Assessment of environmental influences on development of body weight in cohort of children born at high-risk or low-risk for obesity; separated based on maternal BMI, a known risk factor for development of overweight in children. Through environmental and heritability interaction, a clear picture of influence of genes on weight gain can be described. Study will focus on prepubertal age of 6 to 8 years; this age period may be critical period for increased development of overweight. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Cross-sectional study of 55 Caucasian children, 25 at high risk and 30 at low risk of overweight. Physical activity intensity over 7 days collected by TriTrac R3D accelerometry. Parents reported child's typical physical inactivity at age 7 by the Child Activity Questionnaire. BMI calculated from measured height and weight at ages 6, 7, 8 years. FM and FFM measured by dual x-ray absorptiometry at 6 and 8 years, and normalized to height. Results: Vigorous and hard physical activity were predictive of BMI at age 8 in children at high risk for obesity. Risk and physical activity interaction is suggested for children at low risk. Physical activity was not predictive of normalized FM and FFM at age 8. Physical inactivity was negatively associated with measured physical activity in low risk children. Conclusions and Implications: Risk of overweight plays important role in the development of overweight in children, while physical activity offers more protection against overweight in low risk than high risk children.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:06:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:06:36Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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