2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163386
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Caring Partners: Defining Caregiver-Receiver Initiatives
Author(s):
Cannon, Christine A.
Author Details:
Christine A. Cannon, PhD, RN, Associate Professor, University of Delaware School of Nursing, Newark, Delaware, USA, email: ccannon@udel.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: To focus the efforts and energies of a multi-disciplinary team to reduce the bio-psychosocial health consequences of family caregiving. This multimethod research study supported the design and development of a unique program, "Preparing for Caring", for caregivers, ages 30-60, and their partners or parents. Background: While receiving care at home is increasingly common, more affordable, and beneficial, providing long hours of complex care threatens the health and relationships of pouses/partners and adult children. The perceived physical, emotional and relationship strains of these caring "partners" increase risks of their own mortality. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): The realities of the caregiver-receiver contexts were described in face-to-face and telephone interviews, and in written responses to open-ended questions posted online or in mailed questionnaires. Three groups of experts participated in this qualitative study. Twenty-seven community/health professionals who worked in agencies serving local caregiving families were interviewed at their workplaces. Forty-two local family caregivers answered questions at home or at a senior center and 30 caregiving spouses, members of a national Internet listserv, responded to posted questions. Data were analyzed for each of the three groups using content analysis and summarized by impact type. Results were independently supported with summaries of additional caregiver and provider focus groups. Results: Perceived physical impacts included exhaustion, insomnia and overwhelming chronic fatigue, aggravation of pre-existing health problems, and postponement of own health needs. Psychological impacts of fear, guilt, anger, depression, unexpressed emotions, and denial of needs were described. The caregiver-receiver relationship changed in closeness, intimacy, and in communication - in positive and negative ways. Conclusions and Implications: Knowledge of the bio-psychosocial impacts of caregiving-receiving provided guidance in defining and developing the "Preparing for Caring" Program content, organization, and style - reflective of the realities of caregiving. It is now available at www.caringpartnersde.org. Phased program evaluation will assess impact on health.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCaring Partners: Defining Caregiver-Receiver Initiativesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCannon, Christine A.en_US
dc.author.detailsChristine A. Cannon, PhD, RN, Associate Professor, University of Delaware School of Nursing, Newark, Delaware, USA, email: ccannon@udel.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163386-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To focus the efforts and energies of a multi-disciplinary team to reduce the bio-psychosocial health consequences of family caregiving. This multimethod research study supported the design and development of a unique program, "Preparing for Caring", for caregivers, ages 30-60, and their partners or parents. Background: While receiving care at home is increasingly common, more affordable, and beneficial, providing long hours of complex care threatens the health and relationships of pouses/partners and adult children. The perceived physical, emotional and relationship strains of these caring "partners" increase risks of their own mortality. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): The realities of the caregiver-receiver contexts were described in face-to-face and telephone interviews, and in written responses to open-ended questions posted online or in mailed questionnaires. Three groups of experts participated in this qualitative study. Twenty-seven community/health professionals who worked in agencies serving local caregiving families were interviewed at their workplaces. Forty-two local family caregivers answered questions at home or at a senior center and 30 caregiving spouses, members of a national Internet listserv, responded to posted questions. Data were analyzed for each of the three groups using content analysis and summarized by impact type. Results were independently supported with summaries of additional caregiver and provider focus groups. Results: Perceived physical impacts included exhaustion, insomnia and overwhelming chronic fatigue, aggravation of pre-existing health problems, and postponement of own health needs. Psychological impacts of fear, guilt, anger, depression, unexpressed emotions, and denial of needs were described. The caregiver-receiver relationship changed in closeness, intimacy, and in communication - in positive and negative ways. Conclusions and Implications: Knowledge of the bio-psychosocial impacts of caregiving-receiving provided guidance in defining and developing the "Preparing for Caring" Program content, organization, and style - reflective of the realities of caregiving. It is now available at www.caringpartnersde.org. Phased program evaluation will assess impact on health.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:06:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:06:39Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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