The Meaning and Place of Spirituality in the Education of Student Nurses from the Mid-1800s to the Twenty-first Century

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163390
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Meaning and Place of Spirituality in the Education of Student Nurses from the Mid-1800s to the Twenty-first Century
Author(s):
Catanzaro, Ana Maria
Author Details:
Ana Maria Catanzaro, MSN, MA, MHSc, PhD, Associate Professor, Lasalle University School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: catanzar@lasalle.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore changes in the meaning and place of spirituality in basic nursing education from the mid 1800s to the beginning of the twenty-first century. Background: Florence Nightingale effectively integrated the spiritual development of the student nurse with scientific and professional education. Advances in science and cultural developments of the nineteenth and twentieth century, however, contributed to a shift in the meaning and place of spirituality in nursing education. Holistic nursing care demands that nurses address the spirituality of clients; however, today the integration of spirituality into nursing curricula pose significant challenges given that both nursing students and their clients come from a plurality of religious and spiritual traditions. Approach: The study begins with an historical overview of the changing meanings of the term "spirituality" from Biblical times to the present era. A presentation of Florence Nightingale's theology and vision for nursing follows. Social and cultural developments that contributed to changing views regarding spirituality in American society are then presented from the perspectives of scholars in various disciplines including sociology, philosophy, theology, psychology and education. The views of American nurse scholars toward spirituality, as they developed through the decades, are then presented. The study concludes with a critique of current perspectives on spirituality in nursing education and the presentation of possible alternatives that take into account religious pluralism, multiculturalism, and globalization. Major Points & Rationale: There is a serious discontinuity today between the nursing profession's standards of practice, which require nurses to address the spiritual needs of clients, and nursing curricula, which do not consistently prepare students to address the spiritual needs of clients. Conclusions: The principles of interreligous dialogue offer a viable approach to integrating spirituality into nursing curricula in a manner that respects the growing plurality of spiritual traditions in the United States.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Meaning and Place of Spirituality in the Education of Student Nurses from the Mid-1800s to the Twenty-first Centuryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCatanzaro, Ana Mariaen_US
dc.author.detailsAna Maria Catanzaro, MSN, MA, MHSc, PhD, Associate Professor, Lasalle University School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: catanzar@lasalle.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163390-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study was to explore changes in the meaning and place of spirituality in basic nursing education from the mid 1800s to the beginning of the twenty-first century. Background: Florence Nightingale effectively integrated the spiritual development of the student nurse with scientific and professional education. Advances in science and cultural developments of the nineteenth and twentieth century, however, contributed to a shift in the meaning and place of spirituality in nursing education. Holistic nursing care demands that nurses address the spirituality of clients; however, today the integration of spirituality into nursing curricula pose significant challenges given that both nursing students and their clients come from a plurality of religious and spiritual traditions. Approach: The study begins with an historical overview of the changing meanings of the term "spirituality" from Biblical times to the present era. A presentation of Florence Nightingale's theology and vision for nursing follows. Social and cultural developments that contributed to changing views regarding spirituality in American society are then presented from the perspectives of scholars in various disciplines including sociology, philosophy, theology, psychology and education. The views of American nurse scholars toward spirituality, as they developed through the decades, are then presented. The study concludes with a critique of current perspectives on spirituality in nursing education and the presentation of possible alternatives that take into account religious pluralism, multiculturalism, and globalization. Major Points & Rationale: There is a serious discontinuity today between the nursing profession's standards of practice, which require nurses to address the spiritual needs of clients, and nursing curricula, which do not consistently prepare students to address the spiritual needs of clients. Conclusions: The principles of interreligous dialogue offer a viable approach to integrating spirituality into nursing curricula in a manner that respects the growing plurality of spiritual traditions in the United States.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:06:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:06:43Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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