2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163395
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Young Adults' Perceptions of an Ideal Career and a Career in Nursing
Author(s):
Cohen, Judith A.; Palumbo, Mary Val
Author Details:
Judith A. Cohen, PhD, RN, Professor, University of Vermont, Nursing, Burlington, Vermont, USA, email: judith.cohen@uvm.edu; Mary Val Palumbo, DNP, APRN
Abstract:
Purpose: Career marketing themes must be continuously evaluated with different generational cohorts in order to "feed the pipeline" with future nurses. This study explored young adults' perceptions of an ideal career compared to a nursing career in order to develop a timely and effective nursing recruitment campaign in a small rural state. Theoretical Framework: The results are examined in the context of the self-efficacy theory (Bandura, 1977) which suggests that judgments about self-efficacy have a causal relationship with career interests. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A convenience sample of 720 subjects, ages 18-24, was used for this survey research. Set in a small rural state, subjects were invited to participate at local job fairs, an outdoor food festival, a Job Corp residential site, a college campus and an outdoor shopping mall. Part of a larger sample of 720 who completed the ideal career section, 117 subjects also answered questions specifically about nursing while the remainder answered about 5 other healthcare careers. The instrument developed by May et al (1991), measures 18 items on a 5 point Likert scale and has been tested for reliability (coefficient � .84 for the ideal section; coefficient � .81 for nursing). Data were analyzed using the paired t-test with the alpha adjusted to control for multiple tests. Results: The significant differences (all p< .0001) were found between ideal and nursing careers: "am appreciated" (difference 0.71) "are respected" (0.76) "make decisions" (0.80), "being very busy" (-0.72). Characteristics most important to an ideal career were: "being respected" (mean 4.6/5.0) and "am appreciated" (mean 4.5/5.0); whereas, respondents identified that "caring for people" and "working very hard" (both means 4.6/5.0) most strongly described a nursing career. Conclusions and Implications: Based on the findings of this study, more work is necessary to present a career in nursing as an exciting, autonomous profession that has earned the respect and appreciation of the public.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleYoung Adults' Perceptions of an Ideal Career and a Career in Nursingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCohen, Judith A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPalumbo, Mary Valen_US
dc.author.detailsJudith A. Cohen, PhD, RN, Professor, University of Vermont, Nursing, Burlington, Vermont, USA, email: judith.cohen@uvm.edu; Mary Val Palumbo, DNP, APRNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163395-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Career marketing themes must be continuously evaluated with different generational cohorts in order to "feed the pipeline" with future nurses. This study explored young adults' perceptions of an ideal career compared to a nursing career in order to develop a timely and effective nursing recruitment campaign in a small rural state. Theoretical Framework: The results are examined in the context of the self-efficacy theory (Bandura, 1977) which suggests that judgments about self-efficacy have a causal relationship with career interests. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A convenience sample of 720 subjects, ages 18-24, was used for this survey research. Set in a small rural state, subjects were invited to participate at local job fairs, an outdoor food festival, a Job Corp residential site, a college campus and an outdoor shopping mall. Part of a larger sample of 720 who completed the ideal career section, 117 subjects also answered questions specifically about nursing while the remainder answered about 5 other healthcare careers. The instrument developed by May et al (1991), measures 18 items on a 5 point Likert scale and has been tested for reliability (coefficient � .84 for the ideal section; coefficient � .81 for nursing). Data were analyzed using the paired t-test with the alpha adjusted to control for multiple tests. Results: The significant differences (all p< .0001) were found between ideal and nursing careers: "am appreciated" (difference 0.71) "are respected" (0.76) "make decisions" (0.80), "being very busy" (-0.72). Characteristics most important to an ideal career were: "being respected" (mean 4.6/5.0) and "am appreciated" (mean 4.5/5.0); whereas, respondents identified that "caring for people" and "working very hard" (both means 4.6/5.0) most strongly described a nursing career. Conclusions and Implications: Based on the findings of this study, more work is necessary to present a career in nursing as an exciting, autonomous profession that has earned the respect and appreciation of the public.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:06:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:06:49Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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