Psychometric Properties of the Personalized Stigma Subscale of the HIV Stigma Scale

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163397
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Psychometric Properties of the Personalized Stigma Subscale of the HIV Stigma Scale
Author(s):
Colbert, Alison M.; Erlen, Judith A.; Caruthers, Donna D.
Author Details:
Alison M. Colbert, MSN, APRN, BC, Graduate Student Researcher, University of Pittsburgh Health Promotion and Development, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: amc38@pitt.edu; Judith A. Erlen; Donna D. Caruthers
Abstract:
Purpose: Stigma is part of the lived experience for the individual living with HIV/AIDS in America today. In the management of HIV, disease-related stigma has been associated with negative self-perceptions, lower rates of HIV-status disclosure, decreased health care utilization, lower rates of HIV testing, and lower medication adherence. While stigma is consistently a significant issue in HIV disease management, few tools are available to reliably measure stigma. The purpose of this study was to examine the psychometric qualities of the Personalized Stigma Subscale (PSS) of the HIV Stigma Scale. Theoretical Framework: Not applicable. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): The study included 214 participants, 18 years of age or older, free from HIV-related dementia, and self-administering HIV medications. The data for the project came from "Improving Adherence to Protease Inhibitors" (R01 NR04749). A detailed descriptive analysis of the data was performed, as well as assessment of reliability, construct validity, exploratory factor analysis, and bi-variate relationships between personalized stigma and specific baseline demographic variables. Exploratory factor analysis was performed to assess construct validity. Results: The sample was 62.6% white, 68% male, and had a mean age of 40.7 years. Reliability analysis yielded a Cronbach's alpha of .94. Personalized stigma was positively associated with depression (p< .001) and negatively associated with social support (p< .001). Concurrent validity was demonstrated between the PSS and medication-taking self-efficacy (p< .001). Exploratory factor analysis supported the unidimensionality of the instrument. Personalized stigma was significantly higher for women (p< .001), injection drug users (p=.793), and those not currently employed (p=.026), and significantly lower for people who self-identify as gay/bisexual (p=.002). No significant relationships were found between personalized stigma and race, marital status, or annual income. Conclusions and Implications: The Personalized Stigma subscale is a highly reliable and valid tool. Additional research is needed to investigate the use of the PSS as a single measure.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePsychometric Properties of the Personalized Stigma Subscale of the HIV Stigma Scaleen_GB
dc.contributor.authorColbert, Alison M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorErlen, Judith A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCaruthers, Donna D.en_US
dc.author.detailsAlison M. Colbert, MSN, APRN, BC, Graduate Student Researcher, University of Pittsburgh Health Promotion and Development, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: amc38@pitt.edu; Judith A. Erlen; Donna D. Caruthersen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163397-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Stigma is part of the lived experience for the individual living with HIV/AIDS in America today. In the management of HIV, disease-related stigma has been associated with negative self-perceptions, lower rates of HIV-status disclosure, decreased health care utilization, lower rates of HIV testing, and lower medication adherence. While stigma is consistently a significant issue in HIV disease management, few tools are available to reliably measure stigma. The purpose of this study was to examine the psychometric qualities of the Personalized Stigma Subscale (PSS) of the HIV Stigma Scale. Theoretical Framework: Not applicable. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): The study included 214 participants, 18 years of age or older, free from HIV-related dementia, and self-administering HIV medications. The data for the project came from "Improving Adherence to Protease Inhibitors" (R01 NR04749). A detailed descriptive analysis of the data was performed, as well as assessment of reliability, construct validity, exploratory factor analysis, and bi-variate relationships between personalized stigma and specific baseline demographic variables. Exploratory factor analysis was performed to assess construct validity. Results: The sample was 62.6% white, 68% male, and had a mean age of 40.7 years. Reliability analysis yielded a Cronbach's alpha of .94. Personalized stigma was positively associated with depression (p< .001) and negatively associated with social support (p< .001). Concurrent validity was demonstrated between the PSS and medication-taking self-efficacy (p< .001). Exploratory factor analysis supported the unidimensionality of the instrument. Personalized stigma was significantly higher for women (p< .001), injection drug users (p=.793), and those not currently employed (p=.026), and significantly lower for people who self-identify as gay/bisexual (p=.002). No significant relationships were found between personalized stigma and race, marital status, or annual income. Conclusions and Implications: The Personalized Stigma subscale is a highly reliable and valid tool. Additional research is needed to investigate the use of the PSS as a single measure.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:06:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:06:51Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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