2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163398
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hope in Children: Is the Science Developmentally Delayed?
Author(s):
Connelly, Thomas W.
Author Details:
Thomas W. Connelly, Ph.D., RN, Assistant Professor, Boston College William F. Connell School of Nursing, Chestnut Hull, Massachusetts, USA, email: conneltc@bc.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to undertake a comprehensive analysis of hope in school-age children experiencing a chronic illness. Background: Hope is a human characteristic that allows a person, irrespective of age, to transcend disappointments, pursue goals, and view the future with confidence. The majority of studies related to hope have involved adults and older adults with a chronic illness. Despite this work, there remain areas for further inquiry related to the conceptual, multidimensional aspects of hope, the assessment of hope, and the interventions to promote hopefulness in the pediatric population. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): Children, aged seven to thirteen years, who attended a summer camp for musculoskeletal disorders were invited to participate in focus groups. Questions presented included: How does a person get hope? What is the feeling of being hopeful? What do you do to increase your level of hope? What kinds of things have nurses done or said that have increased your hope? Qualitative data analysis techniques will be used by the research team to code responses, derive themes, and develop a conceptual definition of hope for the pediatric population. Results: Pending data analysis. Conclusions and Implications: Pending data analysis.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHope in Children: Is the Science Developmentally Delayed?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorConnelly, Thomas W.en_US
dc.author.detailsThomas W. Connelly, Ph.D., RN, Assistant Professor, Boston College William F. Connell School of Nursing, Chestnut Hull, Massachusetts, USA, email: conneltc@bc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163398-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study was to undertake a comprehensive analysis of hope in school-age children experiencing a chronic illness. Background: Hope is a human characteristic that allows a person, irrespective of age, to transcend disappointments, pursue goals, and view the future with confidence. The majority of studies related to hope have involved adults and older adults with a chronic illness. Despite this work, there remain areas for further inquiry related to the conceptual, multidimensional aspects of hope, the assessment of hope, and the interventions to promote hopefulness in the pediatric population. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): Children, aged seven to thirteen years, who attended a summer camp for musculoskeletal disorders were invited to participate in focus groups. Questions presented included: How does a person get hope? What is the feeling of being hopeful? What do you do to increase your level of hope? What kinds of things have nurses done or said that have increased your hope? Qualitative data analysis techniques will be used by the research team to code responses, derive themes, and develop a conceptual definition of hope for the pediatric population. Results: Pending data analysis. Conclusions and Implications: Pending data analysis.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:06:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:06:52Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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