Black Non-Hispanic Mothers' Perceptions about the Promotion of Infant Feeding Methods by Nurses and Physicians

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163402
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Black Non-Hispanic Mothers' Perceptions about the Promotion of Infant Feeding Methods by Nurses and Physicians
Author(s):
Cricco-Lizza, Roberta Rae
Author Details:
Roberta Rae Cricco-Lizza, RN PhD, MPH, Faculty/Visiting Scholar, University of Pennsylvania Center for Health Disparities, Towaco, New Jersey, USA, email: rcricco@nursing.upenn.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: This study explored low-income, Black non-Hispanic women's reports about the promotion of infant feeding methods by nurses and physicians. Background: Breastfeeding rates in the United States do not meet Healthy People 2010 goals and reflect disparities along racial, ethnic, and income lines. Low-income, Black non-Hispanic women have the lowest breastfeeding rates. Health care professional organizations have issued policy statements that clearly recommend breastfeeding, but questions remain about how well nurses and physicians promote this process. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): An ethnographic approach was used over an 18-month period with interviewing and participant observation of general and key informants. The study took place in an urban Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) clinic and neighborhood in the New York metropolitan area. General informants consisted of 130 Black non-Hispanic mothers enrolled in WIC. Within this group, purposeful sampling was used to find primiparous women to serve as key informants. Eleven key informants were followed closely during pregnancy and the first postpartal year. Audiotaped interviews and field notes were gathered for mothers' descriptions of infant feeding education and support from nurses and physicians. Data were coded and analyzed for recurring patterns and themes. NUD*IST aided data management, retrieval, and analysis. Results: The informants reported limited breastfeeding education and support during pregnancy, childbirth, neonatal intensive care unit (nicu) stays, postpartum, and recovery in the community. They also expressed trust/distrust concerns and varying degrees of anxiety about the ways they were treated by nurses and physicians. Conclusions and Implications: To decrease disparities in breastfeeding, this research suggests that health care professionals should focus their efforts on the development of trusting relationships and continuity of care along with clear, consistent breastfeeding education and support.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBlack Non-Hispanic Mothers' Perceptions about the Promotion of Infant Feeding Methods by Nurses and Physiciansen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCricco-Lizza, Roberta Raeen_US
dc.author.detailsRoberta Rae Cricco-Lizza, RN PhD, MPH, Faculty/Visiting Scholar, University of Pennsylvania Center for Health Disparities, Towaco, New Jersey, USA, email: rcricco@nursing.upenn.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163402-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This study explored low-income, Black non-Hispanic women's reports about the promotion of infant feeding methods by nurses and physicians. Background: Breastfeeding rates in the United States do not meet Healthy People 2010 goals and reflect disparities along racial, ethnic, and income lines. Low-income, Black non-Hispanic women have the lowest breastfeeding rates. Health care professional organizations have issued policy statements that clearly recommend breastfeeding, but questions remain about how well nurses and physicians promote this process. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): An ethnographic approach was used over an 18-month period with interviewing and participant observation of general and key informants. The study took place in an urban Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) clinic and neighborhood in the New York metropolitan area. General informants consisted of 130 Black non-Hispanic mothers enrolled in WIC. Within this group, purposeful sampling was used to find primiparous women to serve as key informants. Eleven key informants were followed closely during pregnancy and the first postpartal year. Audiotaped interviews and field notes were gathered for mothers' descriptions of infant feeding education and support from nurses and physicians. Data were coded and analyzed for recurring patterns and themes. NUD*IST aided data management, retrieval, and analysis. Results: The informants reported limited breastfeeding education and support during pregnancy, childbirth, neonatal intensive care unit (nicu) stays, postpartum, and recovery in the community. They also expressed trust/distrust concerns and varying degrees of anxiety about the ways they were treated by nurses and physicians. Conclusions and Implications: To decrease disparities in breastfeeding, this research suggests that health care professionals should focus their efforts on the development of trusting relationships and continuity of care along with clear, consistent breastfeeding education and support.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:06:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:06:57Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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