An Exploratory Study of A Theoretically Grounded Behavioral Program for Clients with Mild Alzheimer's Disease Living at Home

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163403
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Exploratory Study of A Theoretically Grounded Behavioral Program for Clients with Mild Alzheimer's Disease Living at Home
Author(s):
Curtin, Alicia J.
Author Details:
Alicia J. Curtin, PhD, GNP, Assistant Professor, Memorial Hospital of Rhode Island, Community Nursing, North Dartmouth, Massachusetts, USA, email: alicia_curtin@mhri.org
Abstract:
Purpose: New theoretically sound and effective nursing interventions are needed to help caregivers in the home, maintain the function of clients with mild Alzheimer's Disease (AD) for as long as possible. Background: Recent advancements in the study of memory demonstrate that there is dissociation between procedural and declarative memory systems. Researchers have demonstrated that clients with mild AD have preserved procedural memory despite significant cognitive losses. Accordingly, nursing interventions based on preserved memory should help maintain the function of clients with mild AD in the home setting. A behavioral strategy may be most effective in reactivating the procedural memory in relearning a procedural task by clients with mild AD. Approach: An exploratory design was used to examine the effects of a skills training program in decreasing the need of prompting in preparing a meal by five female clients with mild AD, ranging in age from 71-85, and their caregivers. The training program consisted of 5 consecutive days of training sessions and 5 consecutive days of maintenance sessions using a highly structured, repetitive approach with graded assistance. Major Points & Rationale: Although none of the clients achieved total independence, all five clients decreased their need for prompting in performing the task. Only minimal verbal prompting was needed for clients to complete the task independently. Although, repetition and practice reactivated the procedural memory system to produce the desired behavior, verbal prompting was necessary when learning a new subtask. Conclusions: These findings lend support to the idea that a behavioral strategy may be useful in reactivating the procedural memory of a client with mild AD. In using this approach, there may be a need to consider differentiating tasks based on new learning versus tasks that require relearning. Relearning a certain procedural task may require less training and may be more stable over time than the learning of a new procedural task.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Exploratory Study of A Theoretically Grounded Behavioral Program for Clients with Mild Alzheimer's Disease Living at Homeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCurtin, Alicia J.en_US
dc.author.detailsAlicia J. Curtin, PhD, GNP, Assistant Professor, Memorial Hospital of Rhode Island, Community Nursing, North Dartmouth, Massachusetts, USA, email: alicia_curtin@mhri.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163403-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: New theoretically sound and effective nursing interventions are needed to help caregivers in the home, maintain the function of clients with mild Alzheimer's Disease (AD) for as long as possible. Background: Recent advancements in the study of memory demonstrate that there is dissociation between procedural and declarative memory systems. Researchers have demonstrated that clients with mild AD have preserved procedural memory despite significant cognitive losses. Accordingly, nursing interventions based on preserved memory should help maintain the function of clients with mild AD in the home setting. A behavioral strategy may be most effective in reactivating the procedural memory in relearning a procedural task by clients with mild AD. Approach: An exploratory design was used to examine the effects of a skills training program in decreasing the need of prompting in preparing a meal by five female clients with mild AD, ranging in age from 71-85, and their caregivers. The training program consisted of 5 consecutive days of training sessions and 5 consecutive days of maintenance sessions using a highly structured, repetitive approach with graded assistance. Major Points & Rationale: Although none of the clients achieved total independence, all five clients decreased their need for prompting in performing the task. Only minimal verbal prompting was needed for clients to complete the task independently. Although, repetition and practice reactivated the procedural memory system to produce the desired behavior, verbal prompting was necessary when learning a new subtask. Conclusions: These findings lend support to the idea that a behavioral strategy may be useful in reactivating the procedural memory of a client with mild AD. In using this approach, there may be a need to consider differentiating tasks based on new learning versus tasks that require relearning. Relearning a certain procedural task may require less training and may be more stable over time than the learning of a new procedural task.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:06:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:06:58Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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