2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163404
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Economic Aspects of Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Author(s):
Cushman, Margaret J.; Harrow, Brooke, S.
Author Details:
Margaret J. Cushman, RN, MSN, FAAN, Johns Hopkins University College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: mcushman@jhu.edu; Brooke S. Harrow, PhD
Abstract:
Purpose: Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has shown considerable popularity among the U. S. consuming public: 2002 usage is estimated at 36%. Numerous studies have examined CAM utilization and expenditures. This study reviews and synthesizes the results of these studies in an attempt to identify CAM's role as either a complement or substitute for conventional health care. Background: The growing use of CAM and consumer willingness to pay out-of-pocket, have stimulated a range of responses within the conventional health care community including concerns about safety and efficacy, increased clinical and utilization research, and integration of CAM therapies into treatment settings. Whether CAM is used in addition to conventional health care (complementary), or as a replacement for it (alternative), has economic as well as clinical implications. Methods (sources, analytic approach): This study is part of a larger study of the characteristics of users of herbs as therapeutic agents. A literature search was conducted using PubMed, AMED, CINAHL, and Alt Health Watch databases, from 1990 through February 2005, to identify studies on the utilization, cost, and reimbursement of CAM therapies. Articles were restricted to English only, peer-reviewed. Search strings used were: alternative medicine and cost, alternative medicine and economics, alternative medicine and finance, complementary and cost, complementary and economics, and complementary and finance. Results: The search yielded 177 references. After eliminating articles pertaining to funding of CAM research, regulation, non-research articles, and duplicates; 24 research studies were retained in the sample. Fourteen articles reported studies related to cost, cost-benefit, and/or utilization (demand); eleven reported studies related to insurance or insurance and utilization/ demand. Conclusions and Implications: Definitive labeling of CAM as a complementary or alternative form of health care remains elusive, with a near equal number of studies reporting each pattern of use. Concomitantly, economic categorization of CAM as a complement versus a substitute for conventional medicine remains unclear.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEconomic Aspects of Complementary and Alternative Medicineen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCushman, Margaret J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHarrow, Brooke, S.en_US
dc.author.detailsMargaret J. Cushman, RN, MSN, FAAN, Johns Hopkins University College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: mcushman@jhu.edu; Brooke S. Harrow, PhDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163404-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has shown considerable popularity among the U. S. consuming public: 2002 usage is estimated at 36%. Numerous studies have examined CAM utilization and expenditures. This study reviews and synthesizes the results of these studies in an attempt to identify CAM's role as either a complement or substitute for conventional health care. Background: The growing use of CAM and consumer willingness to pay out-of-pocket, have stimulated a range of responses within the conventional health care community including concerns about safety and efficacy, increased clinical and utilization research, and integration of CAM therapies into treatment settings. Whether CAM is used in addition to conventional health care (complementary), or as a replacement for it (alternative), has economic as well as clinical implications. Methods (sources, analytic approach): This study is part of a larger study of the characteristics of users of herbs as therapeutic agents. A literature search was conducted using PubMed, AMED, CINAHL, and Alt Health Watch databases, from 1990 through February 2005, to identify studies on the utilization, cost, and reimbursement of CAM therapies. Articles were restricted to English only, peer-reviewed. Search strings used were: alternative medicine and cost, alternative medicine and economics, alternative medicine and finance, complementary and cost, complementary and economics, and complementary and finance. Results: The search yielded 177 references. After eliminating articles pertaining to funding of CAM research, regulation, non-research articles, and duplicates; 24 research studies were retained in the sample. Fourteen articles reported studies related to cost, cost-benefit, and/or utilization (demand); eleven reported studies related to insurance or insurance and utilization/ demand. Conclusions and Implications: Definitive labeling of CAM as a complementary or alternative form of health care remains elusive, with a near equal number of studies reporting each pattern of use. Concomitantly, economic categorization of CAM as a complement versus a substitute for conventional medicine remains unclear.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:06:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:06:59Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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