2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163405
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Transition to the Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Role in Great Britain
Author(s):
Cusson, Regina M.
Author Details:
Regina M. Cusson, RNC, APRN, PhD, Professor, University of Connecticut Nursing, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, email: regina.cusson@uconn.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this project was to describe role transition among neonatal nurse practitioners in Great Britain (GB). Background: Research in the U.S. has demonstrated that Neonatal Nurse Practitioners (NNPs) in the neonatal ICU are cost-effective, improve continuity of care, and have a positive impact on family and infant well-being. The few studies that examined role transition in NPs indicated that transition is fraught with anxiety, stress and self-doubt. The NNP role is relatively new in GB and the nursing system differs from the U.S., with increased structure and support in the nursing hierarchy for the novice. Examining role transition in Great Britain may provide insights that will enhance successful role transition among NNPs in the U.S. as well as GB. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): This study used a qualitative descriptive methodology to examine NNP role transition in GB. Following IRB approval, the email list of the British NNP Association was used to recruit subjects. Data collection from 15 participants occurred through online recruitment and completion of open-ended questions about role transition, their work responsibilities, and what the work was like for them, especially as they first became an NNP. Content analysis was used for analyzing the data, extracting patterns and themes. Results: Five themes emerged: A Time of Transition, Pioneering the NNP Role, Roles and Responsibilities, Attaining Competence, and Importance of Other Professional Reactions. The role varied across units, with no uniform standards, credentialing or licensing processes. Transition was influenced by prior experience, feelings of uncertainty, lack of confidence and role models, type of unit and reactions of other professionals.Conclusions and Implications: Many factors influence NNP role development, similar to results reported in early studies of NP roles in the U.S. However, many NNPs felt confident soon after completing their preceptorship, indicating that the more structured system in GB might enhance role transition.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTransition to the Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Role in Great Britainen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCusson, Regina M.en_US
dc.author.detailsRegina M. Cusson, RNC, APRN, PhD, Professor, University of Connecticut Nursing, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, email: regina.cusson@uconn.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163405-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this project was to describe role transition among neonatal nurse practitioners in Great Britain (GB). Background: Research in the U.S. has demonstrated that Neonatal Nurse Practitioners (NNPs) in the neonatal ICU are cost-effective, improve continuity of care, and have a positive impact on family and infant well-being. The few studies that examined role transition in NPs indicated that transition is fraught with anxiety, stress and self-doubt. The NNP role is relatively new in GB and the nursing system differs from the U.S., with increased structure and support in the nursing hierarchy for the novice. Examining role transition in Great Britain may provide insights that will enhance successful role transition among NNPs in the U.S. as well as GB. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): This study used a qualitative descriptive methodology to examine NNP role transition in GB. Following IRB approval, the email list of the British NNP Association was used to recruit subjects. Data collection from 15 participants occurred through online recruitment and completion of open-ended questions about role transition, their work responsibilities, and what the work was like for them, especially as they first became an NNP. Content analysis was used for analyzing the data, extracting patterns and themes. Results: Five themes emerged: A Time of Transition, Pioneering the NNP Role, Roles and Responsibilities, Attaining Competence, and Importance of Other Professional Reactions. The role varied across units, with no uniform standards, credentialing or licensing processes. Transition was influenced by prior experience, feelings of uncertainty, lack of confidence and role models, type of unit and reactions of other professionals.Conclusions and Implications: Many factors influence NNP role development, similar to results reported in early studies of NP roles in the U.S. However, many NNPs felt confident soon after completing their preceptorship, indicating that the more structured system in GB might enhance role transition.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:07:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:07:00Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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