2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163409
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sleep disruption in lung cancer survivors compared to noncancer controls
Author(s):
Dean, Grace E.; Gooneratne, Nalaka; Nkwou, J. Emeka; Rogers, Ann E.; Kaiser, Larry R.
Author Details:
Grace E. Dean, PhD, RN, Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: gdean@nursing.upenn.edu; Nalaka Gooneratne; J. Emeka Nkwou; Ann E. Rogers; Larry R. Kaiser
Abstract:
Purpose: Describe and compare sleep parameters in lung cancer survivors (LCS) with noncancer controls (NCC). Theoretical Framework: The theoretical model that guided this study was the two-process model of sleep regulation. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): An exploratory design was used. Patients with lung cancer at least 5 years from diagnosis (N=76) were recruited from the Cardiothoracic Clinic at HUP. NCC (N=48) were recruited from Penn Partners for Healthy Living. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), demographic and additional questions were completed by telephone survey. Analyses used were descriptive and correlational. Results: Among the 124 participants, the mean age was 74 (SD=6.6; range=61-89), 64 % were female, 90% Caucasian, and 10% African American. No significant differences in demographic variables between groups were found. Mean lung cancer survival was 7.8 years (SD=1.6; range=5-11); 89% received surgery only. LCS spent more hours in bed (8.7 vs 7.7, p< .006), less time asleep (6.5 vs. 6.8, p=.24), had less sleep efficiency (77% vs 89%, p< .001) and reported poorer sleep quality (p< .006) than NCC. LCS reported using medication to help them sleep more often than NCC (p< .001). LCS had more problems with sleep latency, nocturnal awakenings, nocturia, dyspnea, coughing/snoring, and legs twitching/jerking compared to NCC (p< .05). NCC felt too hot and had more pain than LCS (p< .05). Global PSQI was significantly higher in LCS (5.9 vs. 4.5, p< .04). Dyspnea was significantly worse in LCS (2.6 vs. 1.3, p< .03) while pain was significantly worse in NCC (3.3 vs, 2.1, p< .04). No group differences were found in questions on quality of life (QOL), depression and perception of sleeping difficulties. Conclusions and Implications: Results demonstrated robust differences in sleep parameters between groups. While sleep efficiency showed prominent differences between groups, differences of a smaller magnitude were noted in overall perceptions of sleep distress. This suggests habituation towards poor sleep in LCS. Results support additional research to help explain group differences.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSleep disruption in lung cancer survivors compared to noncancer controlsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDean, Grace E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGooneratne, Nalakaen_US
dc.contributor.authorNkwou, J. Emekaen_US
dc.contributor.authorRogers, Ann E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKaiser, Larry R.en_US
dc.author.detailsGrace E. Dean, PhD, RN, Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: gdean@nursing.upenn.edu; Nalaka Gooneratne; J. Emeka Nkwou; Ann E. Rogers; Larry R. Kaiseren_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163409-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Describe and compare sleep parameters in lung cancer survivors (LCS) with noncancer controls (NCC). Theoretical Framework: The theoretical model that guided this study was the two-process model of sleep regulation. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): An exploratory design was used. Patients with lung cancer at least 5 years from diagnosis (N=76) were recruited from the Cardiothoracic Clinic at HUP. NCC (N=48) were recruited from Penn Partners for Healthy Living. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), demographic and additional questions were completed by telephone survey. Analyses used were descriptive and correlational. Results: Among the 124 participants, the mean age was 74 (SD=6.6; range=61-89), 64 % were female, 90% Caucasian, and 10% African American. No significant differences in demographic variables between groups were found. Mean lung cancer survival was 7.8 years (SD=1.6; range=5-11); 89% received surgery only. LCS spent more hours in bed (8.7 vs 7.7, p< .006), less time asleep (6.5 vs. 6.8, p=.24), had less sleep efficiency (77% vs 89%, p< .001) and reported poorer sleep quality (p< .006) than NCC. LCS reported using medication to help them sleep more often than NCC (p< .001). LCS had more problems with sleep latency, nocturnal awakenings, nocturia, dyspnea, coughing/snoring, and legs twitching/jerking compared to NCC (p< .05). NCC felt too hot and had more pain than LCS (p< .05). Global PSQI was significantly higher in LCS (5.9 vs. 4.5, p< .04). Dyspnea was significantly worse in LCS (2.6 vs. 1.3, p< .03) while pain was significantly worse in NCC (3.3 vs, 2.1, p< .04). No group differences were found in questions on quality of life (QOL), depression and perception of sleeping difficulties. Conclusions and Implications: Results demonstrated robust differences in sleep parameters between groups. While sleep efficiency showed prominent differences between groups, differences of a smaller magnitude were noted in overall perceptions of sleep distress. This suggests habituation towards poor sleep in LCS. Results support additional research to help explain group differences.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:07:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:07:05Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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