2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163413
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Helping NH Children Become Their Physical Best
Author(s):
DiNapoli, Pamela; Martin, Tamara; Lewis, James
Author Details:
Pamela DiNapoli, PhD RN, Assistant Professor, University of New Hampshire Nursing, Durham, New Hampshire, USA, email: ppdn@unh.edu; Tamara Martin; James Lewis
Abstract:
Purpose: The impact of obesity is observable in a variety of morbidity indicators. The purpose of this study is to assess current levels of obesity and fitness among New Hampshire adolescents, using non-self-reported data, specifically assessing: 1. Differences in the rate of overweight and at-risk for overweight among ages; 2. Adolescents' fitness levels ; 3. Differences in adolescent fitness levels by age and gender; and 4. The relationship between age, gender, BMI and fitness level. Pinhas-Hamiel et al 1996, Fagot-Campagna et al 2000). Theoretical Framework: Socio Ecological Model of Health Behavior. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Participants (N = 6511 ages 6-14 a representative cross-section of the New Hampshire school districts. Measures: BMI, Fitness: FITNESSGRAM?, the fitness testing component of the "Personal Best" fitness program of the Cooper Institute for Aerobics Research (CIAR 1999. Participants completed five tests: pushups, trunk-lift, curl-ups, back-saver sit and reach and aerobic endurance. SPSS was used to compare changes in body composition; evaluate percentage of participants passing the FITNESSGRAM? tests using chi square tests. Trends among BMI, by age and age and gender were assessed using Pearson's correlation and regression analysis. Stepwise regression analysis was used to assess the relationships among BMI, age, gender, and the percentage of FITNESSGRAM? tests passed. Results: BODY COMPOSITION Findings regarding the body composition of study participants varied. FITNESS The ability of participants to pass the FITNESSGRAM? tests declines markedly with age, and differs between boys and girls, although the HFZ for any particular test is lower for girls. BMI is significantly negatively correlated with performance on all tests. Age is also statistically negatively correlated with performance on all tests. The relationship between gender and performance on the tests is less striking. Conclusions and Implications: Results reflect an increase in the prevalence of overweight adolescents in New Hampshire and offers a cautionary note regarding evolving school policies related to physical education classes.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHelping NH Children Become Their Physical Besten_GB
dc.contributor.authorDiNapoli, Pamelaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Tamaraen_US
dc.contributor.authorLewis, Jamesen_US
dc.author.detailsPamela DiNapoli, PhD RN, Assistant Professor, University of New Hampshire Nursing, Durham, New Hampshire, USA, email: ppdn@unh.edu; Tamara Martin; James Lewisen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163413-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The impact of obesity is observable in a variety of morbidity indicators. The purpose of this study is to assess current levels of obesity and fitness among New Hampshire adolescents, using non-self-reported data, specifically assessing: 1. Differences in the rate of overweight and at-risk for overweight among ages; 2. Adolescents' fitness levels ; 3. Differences in adolescent fitness levels by age and gender; and 4. The relationship between age, gender, BMI and fitness level. Pinhas-Hamiel et al 1996, Fagot-Campagna et al 2000). Theoretical Framework: Socio Ecological Model of Health Behavior. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Participants (N = 6511 ages 6-14 a representative cross-section of the New Hampshire school districts. Measures: BMI, Fitness: FITNESSGRAM?, the fitness testing component of the "Personal Best" fitness program of the Cooper Institute for Aerobics Research (CIAR 1999. Participants completed five tests: pushups, trunk-lift, curl-ups, back-saver sit and reach and aerobic endurance. SPSS was used to compare changes in body composition; evaluate percentage of participants passing the FITNESSGRAM? tests using chi square tests. Trends among BMI, by age and age and gender were assessed using Pearson's correlation and regression analysis. Stepwise regression analysis was used to assess the relationships among BMI, age, gender, and the percentage of FITNESSGRAM? tests passed. Results: BODY COMPOSITION Findings regarding the body composition of study participants varied. FITNESS The ability of participants to pass the FITNESSGRAM? tests declines markedly with age, and differs between boys and girls, although the HFZ for any particular test is lower for girls. BMI is significantly negatively correlated with performance on all tests. Age is also statistically negatively correlated with performance on all tests. The relationship between gender and performance on the tests is less striking. Conclusions and Implications: Results reflect an increase in the prevalence of overweight adolescents in New Hampshire and offers a cautionary note regarding evolving school policies related to physical education classes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:07:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:07:09Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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