A Comparison of the Effectiveness of Computer-Based Learning Courses Among Nursing Staff

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163417
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Comparison of the Effectiveness of Computer-Based Learning Courses Among Nursing Staff
Author(s):
Durkin, Gregory J.
Author Details:
Gregory J. Durkin, RN, M.Ed., Staff Development Specialist, Boston Children's Hospital-Harvard University, Nursing Staff Development, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: gregory.durkin@childrens.harvard.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of the delivery of educational content via two different computer-assisted learning formats. Theoretical Framework: The quality of on-line education varies, and there is little understanding of the effectiveness of computer-assisted learning (CAL). There is a dearth of nursing literature on the effectiveness of CAL, and that which exists is largely inconclusive. This study was designed to determine whether or not interactive courses have better retention rates than text-only courses, and whether or not interactive courses take longer to complete. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): This was a quasi-experimental study with a pre-test/post-test design using 2 versions of a course. The course content was "cranial nerve function." The population was 41 RNs working on a medical unit. Participants were randomly assigned: Group I received the text-only course; Group II received the interactive course. Results showed that although both groups showed significant improvement between their pre-test and post-test 1 scores (p< .000), only Group II nurses had post-test 2 scores that were significantly higher than their pre-test scores (p< .000). Group I nurses' post-test 2 scores had fallen to pre-test levels (p=0.64). The amount of time lapsed between pre-test and post 1 and then from post-test 1 and post-test 2 was not significantly different between groups. There was no significant difference between the Group I and Group II regarding the amount of time the nurses spent taking any of the tests. Group II did not spend a significantly longer amount of time completing the course than Group I (p=0.21). Conclusions and Implications: The results of this study have implications for the type of retention desired. For awareness-level courses, a text-only approach may be suitable. For knowledge retention and sole-source education, an interactive course is probably better. Further study is needed in CAL that is directly a part of the nurses' daily practice.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Comparison of the Effectiveness of Computer-Based Learning Courses Among Nursing Staffen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDurkin, Gregory J.en_US
dc.author.detailsGregory J. Durkin, RN, M.Ed., Staff Development Specialist, Boston Children's Hospital-Harvard University, Nursing Staff Development, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: gregory.durkin@childrens.harvard.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163417-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of the delivery of educational content via two different computer-assisted learning formats. Theoretical Framework: The quality of on-line education varies, and there is little understanding of the effectiveness of computer-assisted learning (CAL). There is a dearth of nursing literature on the effectiveness of CAL, and that which exists is largely inconclusive. This study was designed to determine whether or not interactive courses have better retention rates than text-only courses, and whether or not interactive courses take longer to complete. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): This was a quasi-experimental study with a pre-test/post-test design using 2 versions of a course. The course content was "cranial nerve function." The population was 41 RNs working on a medical unit. Participants were randomly assigned: Group I received the text-only course; Group II received the interactive course. Results showed that although both groups showed significant improvement between their pre-test and post-test 1 scores (p< .000), only Group II nurses had post-test 2 scores that were significantly higher than their pre-test scores (p< .000). Group I nurses' post-test 2 scores had fallen to pre-test levels (p=0.64). The amount of time lapsed between pre-test and post 1 and then from post-test 1 and post-test 2 was not significantly different between groups. There was no significant difference between the Group I and Group II regarding the amount of time the nurses spent taking any of the tests. Group II did not spend a significantly longer amount of time completing the course than Group I (p=0.21). Conclusions and Implications: The results of this study have implications for the type of retention desired. For awareness-level courses, a text-only approach may be suitable. For knowledge retention and sole-source education, an interactive course is probably better. Further study is needed in CAL that is directly a part of the nurses' daily practice.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:07:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:07:13Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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