2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163419
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Father-Daughter Relationship in Anorexia Nervosa: A Narrative Analysis
Author(s):
Elliott, J. Carol
Author Details:
J. Carol Elliott, PhD, RN, CS, Assistant Professor, University of New England Nursing, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, USA, email: celliott@une.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: This study's purpose was to describe the nature and meaning of the father-daughter relationship from the recovering daughter's perspective. Background: Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a significant health problem. Research was needed to explore the interaction of risks, vulnerability, and significant relationships over time that might contribute to its development. Fathers significantly influence a daughter's development. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): Using narrative analysis, the participants' stories, told in a naturalistic setting, were extracted from data obtained via a photo-interviewing technique. I examined and interpreted the meaning of the paternal relationship stories throughout their lives considering changes. Eleven New England residents, aged 18 to 60, participated. Results: Several patterns emerged. In childhood, the pattern, Life in the Fast Lane, appeared. They perceived the need to grow up quickly. During their transitions to and from adolescence, the pattern, Like Father; Like Daughter, emerged. The participants and their fathers had comparable temperaments; and they coped with problems similarly. During adolescence, the fathers disappeared from their lives, as indicated by Now You See Him; Now You Don't; and, as their fathers did, the participants began to disappear, designated by Now You See Her; Now, You Don't. For the participants, AN necessitated a change and was The Catalyst for change in their relationships. This pattern contains several variations. For some, the participants changed, indicated by She Changed. For others, the fathers changed, illustrated in He Changed. They Changed described how several of the participants and fathers changed. Conclusions and Implications: A few participants demonstrated No Change. When participants or fathers did or could not change, AN's symptoms continued. The participants' current relationships with their fathers, the Catalytic Reaction, were shaped by their responses to the Catalyst. The findings have implications for nursing practice, research and health policy. This study is a beginning exploration into processes that lead to, through, and into recovery from AN.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Father-Daughter Relationship in Anorexia Nervosa: A Narrative Analysisen_GB
dc.contributor.authorElliott, J. Carolen_US
dc.author.detailsJ. Carol Elliott, PhD, RN, CS, Assistant Professor, University of New England Nursing, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, USA, email: celliott@une.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163419-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This study's purpose was to describe the nature and meaning of the father-daughter relationship from the recovering daughter's perspective. Background: Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a significant health problem. Research was needed to explore the interaction of risks, vulnerability, and significant relationships over time that might contribute to its development. Fathers significantly influence a daughter's development. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): Using narrative analysis, the participants' stories, told in a naturalistic setting, were extracted from data obtained via a photo-interviewing technique. I examined and interpreted the meaning of the paternal relationship stories throughout their lives considering changes. Eleven New England residents, aged 18 to 60, participated. Results: Several patterns emerged. In childhood, the pattern, Life in the Fast Lane, appeared. They perceived the need to grow up quickly. During their transitions to and from adolescence, the pattern, Like Father; Like Daughter, emerged. The participants and their fathers had comparable temperaments; and they coped with problems similarly. During adolescence, the fathers disappeared from their lives, as indicated by Now You See Him; Now You Don't; and, as their fathers did, the participants began to disappear, designated by Now You See Her; Now, You Don't. For the participants, AN necessitated a change and was The Catalyst for change in their relationships. This pattern contains several variations. For some, the participants changed, indicated by She Changed. For others, the fathers changed, illustrated in He Changed. They Changed described how several of the participants and fathers changed. Conclusions and Implications: A few participants demonstrated No Change. When participants or fathers did or could not change, AN's symptoms continued. The participants' current relationships with their fathers, the Catalytic Reaction, were shaped by their responses to the Catalyst. The findings have implications for nursing practice, research and health policy. This study is a beginning exploration into processes that lead to, through, and into recovery from AN.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:07:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:07:15Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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