The use of clinical vignettes to evaluate nursing knowledge and recognition of delirium in persons with dementia

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163426
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The use of clinical vignettes to evaluate nursing knowledge and recognition of delirium in persons with dementia
Author(s):
Fick, Donna M.; Hughes, Regina M.; Lawrence, Frank R.; Steis, Melinda R.; Hodo, Denise
Author Details:
Donna M. Fick, PhD, APRN-BC, Associate Professor, Penn State University Nursing/College of Health and Human Development, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA, email: dmf21@psu.edu; Regina M. Hughes, Student; Frank R. Lawrence, PhD; Melinda R. Steis, RN, MS; Denise Hodo, BA
Abstract:
Purpose: Delirium is prevalent among hospitalized elderly patients and leads to poor outcomes. Delirium superimposed on dementia (DSD) occurs when a person with preexisting dementia develops delirium. Previous research has described nurse detection of delirium, but no published studies could be found that examined nursing knowledge of DSD. The purpose of this study was to assess nursing knowledge and recognition of delirium superimposed on dementia utilizing standardized case vignettes. Theoretical Framework: The case vignettes are based on O'Keefe's delirium subtypes and Lave's theory of situated learning. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A convenience sample of nurses and patient care technicians from 2 medical-surgical units in an Academic Medical Center (AMC) in the southeast United States participated in the cross-sectional survey. The surveys consisted of a questionnaire of geri-psychiatric knowledge, the Mary Starke Harper Aging Knowledge Exam (MSHAKE), and a questionnaire developed by the investigator from the literature on delirium subtypes and evaluated for face validity. The MSHAKE is a 25-item true-false questionnaire. The second questionnaire contained 5 vignettes that depicted patients experiencing dementia, hypoactive delirium, hyperactive delirium, hyperactive DSD and hypoactive DSD. Results: Forty six subjects were approached for consent. Forty-four hospital staff completed the questionnaire for a response rate of 96%. Twenty-nine of the respondents were registered nurses with average age of 39 and a mean of 14 years of experience as a nurse. The results of the vignettes revealed that the nurses were good at identifying dementia (83%), but had difficulty correctly identifying delirium versus DSD, as well as identifying the hypoactive form of delirium and DSD. Only 21% were able to correctly identify the hypoactive form of DSD, and 41% correctly identified delirium. Conclusions and Implications: Nurses play a key role in detection of delirium in a growing population of persons with dementia. The results of this study will be used to test interventions to increase nursing recognition of DSD.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe use of clinical vignettes to evaluate nursing knowledge and recognition of delirium in persons with dementiaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFick, Donna M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHughes, Regina M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLawrence, Frank R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSteis, Melinda R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHodo, Deniseen_US
dc.author.detailsDonna M. Fick, PhD, APRN-BC, Associate Professor, Penn State University Nursing/College of Health and Human Development, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA, email: dmf21@psu.edu; Regina M. Hughes, Student; Frank R. Lawrence, PhD; Melinda R. Steis, RN, MS; Denise Hodo, BAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163426-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Delirium is prevalent among hospitalized elderly patients and leads to poor outcomes. Delirium superimposed on dementia (DSD) occurs when a person with preexisting dementia develops delirium. Previous research has described nurse detection of delirium, but no published studies could be found that examined nursing knowledge of DSD. The purpose of this study was to assess nursing knowledge and recognition of delirium superimposed on dementia utilizing standardized case vignettes. Theoretical Framework: The case vignettes are based on O'Keefe's delirium subtypes and Lave's theory of situated learning. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A convenience sample of nurses and patient care technicians from 2 medical-surgical units in an Academic Medical Center (AMC) in the southeast United States participated in the cross-sectional survey. The surveys consisted of a questionnaire of geri-psychiatric knowledge, the Mary Starke Harper Aging Knowledge Exam (MSHAKE), and a questionnaire developed by the investigator from the literature on delirium subtypes and evaluated for face validity. The MSHAKE is a 25-item true-false questionnaire. The second questionnaire contained 5 vignettes that depicted patients experiencing dementia, hypoactive delirium, hyperactive delirium, hyperactive DSD and hypoactive DSD. Results: Forty six subjects were approached for consent. Forty-four hospital staff completed the questionnaire for a response rate of 96%. Twenty-nine of the respondents were registered nurses with average age of 39 and a mean of 14 years of experience as a nurse. The results of the vignettes revealed that the nurses were good at identifying dementia (83%), but had difficulty correctly identifying delirium versus DSD, as well as identifying the hypoactive form of delirium and DSD. Only 21% were able to correctly identify the hypoactive form of DSD, and 41% correctly identified delirium. Conclusions and Implications: Nurses play a key role in detection of delirium in a growing population of persons with dementia. The results of this study will be used to test interventions to increase nursing recognition of DSD.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:07:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:07:22Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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